Reasons to Consider a Healthcare Career (Part Two)

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NOTE: This is the second piece in a five-part series that aims to bring up some compelling reasons for considering a career in the healthcare industry. Click here to read part one of this series.

As some might already know, the healthcare sector is a huge industry that employs a whole lot of people in the United States and around the world. In addition, the healthcare sector continues to grow each and every day due to an array of factors. These factors include an increasing population, varied funding sources, and a large number of aging people that belong to the Baby Boomer generation who need healthcare since they have chronic illnesses that are associated with advanced age.

Hence, it would make logical sense that a massive field such as the healthcare industry would be loaded with plenty of lucrative opportunities for those with enough tenacity and grit to continually plug away at it until they meet their career goals. A multitude of great reasons exist for seriously thinking about paving a path into healthcare career. Continue to read in order to discover a few more of these solid reasons!

REASON 4: There is the potential to have a positive impact on patients.

Regardless of one’s role or job title in the healthcare industry, every single task will contribute in some way to helping patients and their families. A career in the healthcare field enables workers to achieve their goals of assisting people while simultaneously earning a paycheck and livelihood. Every duty and task in healthcare is meaningful and effective in some way.

As previously stated, one’s role in healthcare does not matter in relation to the positive things that can be carried out. For instance, a dietary aide can make a patient feel like his preferences matter when she asks him about his likes and dislikes concerning food. A nursing assistant can lift the spirits of the lonely elderly patient by paying attention to him. The activities director can spark interest and put smiles on the faces of bored nursing home residents.

REASON 5: Multiple career options exist for people with differing preferences.

Some people thrive when they have close contact with others. These people would be fulfilled with a healthcare career that allows them to provide direct patient care and build meaningful relationships during the course of each shift at work. Nursing assistants, nurses, and other members of direct care nursing staff typically have the closest contact with patients and their families.

Other people prefer to assist society in a more indirect manner while working behind the scenes. These types of people would also be fulfilled with a career in the healthcare field that allows them to be of assistance in a less visible way. For instance, case managers coordinate the care of patients and assist them with obtaining services without ever laying a finger on them. A few case managers work remotely via telephone, and therefore, never meet patients face to face.

REASON 6: Healthcare workers are held in high esteem by the public.

Individuals who work in the healthcare field are often held in high esteem as valuable members of society. This is due to the fact that they devote their time to at work to assist other people. Healthcare workers of all types are also regarded as important because they routinely provide services that are very much needed and potentially life-saving.

The nursing assistant who notifies the charge nurse on duty that one of her patients has left-sided chest pain might have saved a life by reporting a change in a patient’s status in a timely manner, thereby preventing a heart attack. The restorative aide who assists a choking patient with the Heimlich maneuver during mealtime might have saved a life by intervening with a sense of urgency.

Healthcare workers give so much of themselves throughout the course of a typical shift at the workplace. Most members of the general public are keenly aware of the sacrifices made by the selfless people who work in the healthcare industry. Therefore, the public tends to view healthcare workers in an immensely positive light.

Now is the time to enter the healthcare industry. You can enjoy a career as a nursing assistant in as little as 7 days (one week) in the D/FW area of Texas. Call Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School at (682)626-5266 to enroll in affordable certified assistant classes now. Jump-start your legacy today…

 

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Reasons to Consider a Healthcare Career (Part One)

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NOTE: This piece is the very first post in a comprehensive six-part series of essays that attempts to shine the figurative light upon some of the more compelling reasons people should seriously think about paving a career pathway in the burgeoning healthcare industry. Click here to read the second part, and click here for part three. Also, click here for parts four and five. Finally, click right here to read part six.

Healthcare is a huge industry in many countries around the world. Therefore, it would make absolutely perfect sense that a large industry such as healthcare would be bursting at the seams with an abundance of good opportunities for people who have enough tenacity to pursue it as a career. A number of very compelling reasons exist for considering a career pathway in the healthcare field. Keep reading to unearth some of these reasons!

REASON 1: Healthcare workplaces tend to be very interesting.

It is true: there is hardly ever a dull moment in healthcare. There will always be a new admission, discharge, interesting medical conditions, entertaining family members, helpful coworkers, changing workflows, and learning opportunities to keep your days at work filled with excitement. Healthcare work environments such as hospitals and skilled nursing facilities tend to be particularly interesting workplaces.

REASON 2: Healthcare jobs are associated with good pay and benefits.

The majority of healthcare job openings are for full-time positions that offer steady pay, decent benefit packages, and the potential for wage increases. In addition to the pay, the benefit packages are worth some money, too! Benefits such as employer-sponsored health insurance, paid time off, vacation hours, sick pay and life insurance cost the employer money while financially benefiting you.

Also, many employers provide a perk known as 401k matching. In other words, if a worker contributes a certain amount of money to a 401k retirement account, the employer will actually match it by contributing the exact same amount. This can result in thousands of free dollars to the employee every year if regular 401k contributions are made. 401k matching is a fringe benefit that cannot be beat!

REASON 3: Some healthcare jobs do not require many years of training.

A number of the most popular healthcare jobs do not require many years of education or training. For example, an individual can become a certified nursing assistant (CNA) in just a few short weeks. A person can study to become a medical assistant in a few short months. Moreover, someone can become a licensed practical nurse (LPN), known as a licensed vocational nurse (LVN) in Texas and California, in about a year.

Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School is excited to announce course offerings that can enable people to enter the healthcare industry in as little as 7 days (one week). Legacy Healthcare Careers offers a 4-week CNA program as well as a 1-week CNA program in the Dallas-Fort Worth area of Texas. Both CNA courses of study are state-approved and can permanently transform students’ lives by jump-starting their healthcare careers.

Please place that telephone call to Legacy Healthcare Careers at (682)626-5266 to enroll. Legacy Healthcare Careers will also offer a certified medication aide program in the very near future to CNAs and direct care workers who would like to advance their healthcare careers to the next level. Jump-start your legacy today…

 

Top Questions You Must Ask Of Any Nursing Assistant Training Program

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To communicate this message in the most straightforward manner possible, not all certified nursing assistant (CNA) training programs are created equally. First of all, some CNA programs are offered at community colleges whereas other classes are taught at private schools or nonprofit organizations. Second of all, differing schools can charge drastically different tuition and fees for what is essentially the same CNA training.

Thirdly, some schools offer ongoing support services after students graduate from the nursing assistant training program while other schools offer absolutely nothing whatsoever. Ongoing support for nursing assistant graduates that some schools offer can be in the form of job placement assistance, CNA state test preparation courses post-graduation, provision of recommendation letters to other schools and employers, and help with writing résumés and cover letters.

Without further ado, the following is a compilation of questions that prospective students may wish to ask of any nursing assistant training programs they are considering attending.

  1. Is the CNA program approved? Nurse aide training programs must be approved to operate in the state where the school is located. If the nurse aide training program is not approved, graduates will typically not qualify to sit for the CNA state test.
  2. How long does the CNA program take to complete? Some programs take a week or two to complete, whereas other programs drag it out over the duration of an 16-week entire semester.
  3.  Does this program offer job placement assistance? Some nurse aide training programs offer job placement assistance to graduates, which is an immensely helpful service.
  4. Is the CNA program taught by nurses? Most states require nurse aide training programs to be taught by licensed nurses. Some CNA programs employ registered nurses (RNs) to teach all classes, whereas other programs utilize licensed practical/ vocational nurses (LPNs/ LVNs) to provide all the instruction. RNs tend to have more years of clinical and theoretical education than LPNs/ LVNs.
  5. Does the school offer help with passing the CNA state test? Some programs provide ongoing support to help graduates of the CNA training program pass the CNA state test. This is a fabulously helpful service that comes in handy to graduates who need extra help.
  6. What is the average class size? Some schools offer smaller class sizes of less than 10 pupils per class. Other CNA programs can have up to 20+ students attending nurse aide classes together. In general, smaller class sizes can translate into a higher level of individualized attention and more time for questions.

The nursing assistant training programs at Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School are fully approved to operate by the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) and the state Department of Aging and Disability (DADS). In addition, Legacy Healthcare Careers offers job placement assistance to graduates, preparation for the CNA state test, and small class sizes that promote individualized attention to all students.

Moreover, all classes offered at Legacy Healthcare Careers are taught by RNs with many years of combined clinical experience. The tuition and fees for the CNA classes are affordable; additionally, the school offers a highly innovative 7-day course of study that enables students to become nursing assistants in only one week. Call (682)626-5266 to enroll or visit the school’s website at www.LegacyHealthcareCareers.com for more information.

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Texas CNA Skills (Part Nine): Skills on the CNA State Test that Require Measurements

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The National Nurse Aide Assessment Program, or NNAAP for short, is a nationwide credentialing program for nurse aides who want to pursue certification as a certified nursing assistant (CNA). In other words, the NNAAP exam is better known as the CNA state test. Additionally, the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) is the entity that has been entrusted with the formulation, revision and administration of the CNA state test.

In most states in the US, the CNA state test is comprised of two distinct sections: a written (or oral) knowledge test made up of 70 multiple choice questions, and a procedural skills competency evaluation consisting of five different hands-on skills that must be demonstrated in front of a nurse aide evaluator.

The procedural hands-on skills evaluation section of the CNA state test takes place in a setting that has been arranged to simulate a patient care environment such as a room inside a long term care facility. Each test taker will have exactly 30 minutes to demonstrate competency in the five skills. The nurse aide candidate must attain a passing cut score on four out of the five procedural skills in order to pass the skills evaluation section of the CNA state test.

The first procedural skill that all test takers in Texas complete is hand-washing, and the remaining four skills will be selected totally at random. Moreover, the NNAAP skills evaluation mandates that all test takers complete at least one numerical measurement skill as part of the CNA state test (Pearson Vue, 2018). All of the hands-on procedural skills that require documentation of a numeric measurement have been listed below.

  1. Measurement and documentation of blood pressure
  2. Measurement and documentation of respiration rate
  3. Measurement and documentation of radial pulse
  4. Measurement and documentation of urinary output
  5. Measurement and documentation of an ambulatory patient’s body weight

On the scheduled day of the CNA state test, the test taker will need to bring three sharpened number two pencils with erasers to the testing center site to record the numerical measurements. The test taker will also need to bring a wristwatch with a second hand to the testing center to perform certain skills.

During the CNA state test, nurse aide test takers in Texas will be using the following standardized, approved form to document the numerical measurement(s) of the random procedural skill(s) they have been assigned.

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REFERENCES

National Council of State Boards of Nursing. (2018). NNAAP & MACE. Retrieved from https://www.ncsbn.org/nnaap-and-mace.htm

Pearson Vue. (2018). Texas Nurse Aide Candidate Handbook. Retrieved from https://home.pearsonvue.com/getattachment/73a0c524-4cbe-401a-aa5c-fe1ebf4e2517/Texas

Texas CNA Skills (Part Seven): Critical Element Steps in the Skills Competency Section of the CNA State Test

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Nursing assistants who want to obtain certification as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) will need to pass the CNA state examination for the state where they plan to work. In the state of Texas, the CNA state test consists of two sections: a written (or oral) examination with a series of 70 multiple choice questions, as well as a hands-on skills competency evaluation consisting of five procedural skills that are to be performed in the presence of a testing site nurse aide evaluator.

During the skills section of the CNA state test, all test takers will need to successfully perform hand washing as the first procedural skill. Thereafter, the test taker will be required to perform an additional four out of five testable procedural skills. The remaining four testable skills will be selected completely at random.

Before the skills evaluation section of the CNA state test starts, the testing site nurse aide evaluator hands the test taker an instruction card that lists the randomly selected procedural skills that must be completed. Hand washing is the only CNA state test procedural skill that is not selected randomly. In other words, all nurse aide candidates who take the Texas CNA state test will be assigned the skill of hand washing during the skills evaluation portion.

Critical element steps are also referred to as critical steps, key steps, critical items, and critical elements. According to Pearson Vue (2018), critical element steps are the important actions associated with each procedural skill that the test taker must complete with accuracy in order to pass that particular skill. In other words, critical element steps are actions that must always be performed when completing a skill in front of the testing center nurse aide evaluator during the CNA state test.

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A nursing assistant candidate will most certainly fail the hands-on skills evaluation section of the CNA state test if he or she forgets to perform, misses, or incorrectly performs any critical element steps associated with a particular procedural skill. Also, be advised that most, but not all, skills have critical element steps that need to be correctly done in order to successfully complete the entire procedure with a passing cut score.

As an example, the procedural skill of cleaning an upper or lower denture has no critical element steps associated with it. However, the skill of measuring and recording a patient’s respirations has at least one critical element step attributed to it. Missing, forgetting, or incorrectly completing the critical element step associated with measuring and recording respirations means that the test taker fails the entire skill.

The skill of measuring and recording a patient’s respiratory rate is listed below in a step by step sequence, along with the single critical element step associated with this procedure. The critical element step is emboldened and underlined.

  1. The nursing assistant explains the procedure using clear and slow speech that is understandable. The nursing assistant maintains face to face contact with the client as much as possible.
  2. The nursing assistant measures the client’s respiration rate for one whole minute.
  3. The nursing assistant makes sure that the client’s call bell or signaling device is within reasonable reach.
  4. The nursing assistant washes his or her hands before documenting the client’s respiration rate.
  5. The nursing assistant is to document a respiration rate number that falls approximately within plus or minus two breaths of the testing site nurse aide evaluator’s documented number.

In general, most provisions related to safety, privacy, numerical measurements and infection control are usually regarded as critical element steps for testing purposes while taking the skills competency section of the CNA state test. The test taker cannot miss any critical element steps while performing a hands-on procedural skill at the testing center, or else he or she will automatically fail that particular skill.

In fact, most failures on the skills evaluation portion of the CNA state test can be attributed to the test taker’s omission or forgetfulness of the critical element steps on procedural skills regarding client safety, rights, numerical measurement documentation, or privacy maintenance. In summary, do one’s best to avoid missing any critical element steps at the testing center.

REFERENCES

Pearson Vue. (2018). Texas Nurse Aide Candidate Handbook. Retrieved from https://home.pearsonvue.com/getattachment/73a0c524-4cbe-401a-aa5c-fe1ebf4e2517/Texas

 

 

 

Nursing Career Ladder in the United States (Part Three): the Registered Nurse (RN)

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This post is intended to be the third in a four-part installment series that aims to illuminate the dynamic, ever-evolving nursing career ladder in the United States.

The first post in this particular series discussed certified nursing assistants, known as CNAs for short. The second post in this series elaborated on the unique importance of licensed practical nurses (LPNs), also known as licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) in the states of California and Texas. This post will shed some light on registered nurses.

A professional registered nurse, known as an RN for short, is a multi-faceted healthcare professional who is entrusted with the delivery of both direct and indirect nursing care duties and responsibilities. During the course of providing nursing care, the RN observes, assesses and records objective signs and subjective symptoms that patients experience.

RNs document additional findings such as reactions to treatments, progress and patient outcomes. The RN’s keen observations and clear documentation serve as the the hardcore foundation for the planning of patient care, initiation of interventions, and overall evaluation of the patient care that is being provided.

RNs routinely report changes in patients’ conditions to the physician and carry out physicians’ orders as indicated. Moreover, RNs promptly respond to subtle and overt changes in condition to prevent further deterioration of patients’ health statuses. RNs work work in bedside or clinical settings may perform a wide repertoire of procedural skills such as medication administration, complex wound care, respiratory ventilator management, and so forth.

RNs plan all aspects of the care of their patients. In fact, RNs continually formulate and revise nursing plans of care. RNs also teach and educate patients and families on the provision of appropriate care techniques. They also help different individuals, groups and populations to sustain and/or improve their various health statuses.

Professional registered nursing practice regularly draws upon an amazingly large fund of knowledge in order for the nurse to deliver appropriate assessment, planning, nursing diagnoses, intervention and evaluation. These actions, collectively referred to as the nursing process, are executed in a timely fashion to promote patients’ health statuses, prevent devastating illnesses and help clients manage their varied disease processes.

RNs can be found working in varied healthcare settings such as hospitals, extended care facilities, hospices, clinics, doctors offices, home health companies, colleges, universities, occupational health centers, private duty cases, and psychiatric facilities. RNs also work for insurance companies, research firms, governmental agencies, jails, prisons, public health centers, parishes, pharmaceutical corporations, and an array of other workplace settings.

While state laws tend to dictate nursing’s breadth and scope of practice, it is often the specific needs of the patient load on a particular day that determine the RN’s duties for that day. To become an RN, a prospective candidate must graduate from a state-approved nursing program at a community college, diploma school of nursing, trade school, technical college, or university. The graduate must also pass a national exam to secure state licensure as a registered nurse.

Many certified nursing assistants (CNAs) continue their education to become LPNs and/or RNs, thereby ascending the nursing career ladder. Legacy Healthcare Careers offers four-week CNA classes in the Dallas/Fort Worth area that are affordable and will fit in with prospective pupils’ budgets and lifestyles. Call (682)626-5266 or the 24-hour hotline at (682)313-6404 to enroll at our Mid-Cities / HEB area location.

Be sure to look for the fourth and final post in this information-packed four-part series on the dynamic nursing career ladder in the United States. Also, do not forget to place a quick telephone call to Legacy Healthcare Careers at (682)626-5266 or the 24-hour hotline at (682)313-6404 to enroll in fast-track certified nursing assistant (CNA) training coursework.

Nursing Career Ladder in the United States (Part One): Certified Nursing Assistants

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This post is the first of a four-part series that will aim to elucidate the nursing career ladder in the United States. The certified nursing assistant (CNA) is the core foundation and backbone of the nursing career ladder in the United States. Without the hard work and merit-worthy contributions of CNAs, most nurses who work in direct patient care capacities would have extreme difficulty accomplishing the myriad of duties and tasks.

CNAs are vital allied healthcare workers who deliver basic nursing care to patients, residents and clients under the supervision of licensed nurses and physicians. CNAs assist patients and residents with the care tasks that the patient might be unable to do on his or her own due to weakness, debility, illness, cognitive impairment, fluctuations in mentation, or a variety of other reasons.

In essence, CNAs are supervised by licensed nurses while assisting patients with basic nursing care tasks. These basic nursing tasks include routine care duties such as getting dressed, making occupied and unoccupied beds, taking showers, helping with feedings at mealtimes, taking baths, using the toilet, performing incontinent care, taking and documenting vital signs, and observing and reporting changes in patients’ conditions.

CNAs often spend more time with the patient than any other member of the healthcare team. Their insights and observations are often utilized to formulate patients’ plans of care. In addition, CNAs report their observations and suspected changes in patients’ conditions to the nurse. Therefore, the role of a CNA is vital to the functioning of the healthcare industry in the United States.

CNAs can be found working in hospitals, home health companies, private duty cases, skilled nursing facilities, group homes, clinics, psychiatric facilities, rehabilitation centers, hospices, adult daycare settings, prison infirmaries, the military, and a number of other types of workplace settings.

CNAs, also known as nurse aides, are the premier backbones of the majority of hospitals, healthcare centers and skilled nursing facilities in the United States.  Legacy Healthcare Careers LLC provides low-cost, high-quality certified nursing assistant classes that will prepare prospective pupils for a dynamic career in allied healthcare as a Dallas/Fort Worth nurses aide in just a few weeks. Telephone (682)626-5266 or the 24-hour hotline at (682)313-6404 to enroll in CNA classes in the Mid-Cities / HEB area.

While the CNA occupies an amazingly important role in the nursing profession, many nurses aides opt to utilize the CNA career as a foundation-like springboard into other higher-paying nursing career pathways such as the licensed practical / vocational nurse (LPN / LVN), professional registered nurse (RN), and the advanced practice nurse (APN). In other words, many CNAs choose to climb up the nursing career ladder for increased pay and employment opportunities filled with more complexities.

Please stay tuned for part two of this four-part series that sheds some light on the nursing career ladder in the United States.

Where Can I Train to Become a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) in the Dallas-Fort Worth Area?

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When the topic of nurse aide training is brought to the forefront, a number of different options are available to a prospective student located in the Dallas-Fort Worth area of Texas who would like to train to become a certified nursing assistant (CNA). CNAs are also known as nurses aides, patient care assistants, nursing aides, nursing assistants, and orderlies.

First of all, multiple local community colleges provide high-quality nursing assistant training in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. Some of the local community college programs that deliver nursing assistant training programs include Brookhaven College, Tarrant County College (TCC), North Central Texas College (NCTC), Hill College, Trinity Valley Community College (TVCC), El Centro College, Weatherford College, and Navarro College.

Community college CNA programs are wonderful options for several reasons. First and foremost, community college CNA programs tend to be very affordable. Second of all, community college CNA programs simultaneously provide excellent nurse aide training, academic instruction and practical hands-on preparation to pupils.

Nonetheless, a major drawback associated with typical community college CNA programs is the fact that the training can sometimes take eight (8) weeks or longer to complete. Not everyone wants to spend half a semester in the nurse aide training program. After all, time is of the essence.

Another potential drawback is that these community college CNA programs frequently have inflexible admissions requirements that may exclude many wonderful prospective students. Normally, these programs attract far more interested applicants than can be reasonably admitted while not having enough seats available to everyone who would like to attend CNA school. In other words, some prospective students are turned away due to seats filling quickly at community college CNA programs.

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Legacy Healthcare Careers LLC is a school that provides very affordable CNA classes in the heart of the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. The CNA lessons are approved to operate by both the state Department on Aging and Disability Services (DADS) and the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC).

Tuition is for the certified nursing assistant program is $850 and the program is only two weeks long from start to graduation. Also, Legacy Healthcare Careers offers a fast track one-week CNA program. Moreover, a high school diploma or general education diploma (GED) is not needed to enroll.

In addition, Legacy Healthcare Careers provides theoretical and clinical practicum instruction to students that is based on the Texas-approved state curriculum. Moreover, the one-week and two-week nursing assistant training programs can potentially open the doors to a dynamic allied healthcare career as a nursing assistant in LESS THAN ONE WEEK!

Feel free to call Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School at (682)626-5266 or telephone the 24-hour hotline at (682)313-6404 for more information regarding enrollment. Classes are starting soon.

CNA School in the Fort Worth Mid-Cities Area of Texas

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Legacy Healthcare Careers LLC, a CNA school with fast track one, two and three-week certified nursing assistant programs at a convenient Mid-Cities HEB area location in the middle of the Dallas / Fort Worth Metroplex region of Texas, has been open to the public and is currently seeking students. Furthermore, Legacy Healthcare Careers has open enrollment policies and is accepting new students for immediate admissions.

The physical address for Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School’s campus is 7100 Boulevard 26, Suite 205, Richland Hills, Texas 76180. The telephone number for Legacy Healthcare Careers (682)626-5266. In addition, the 24-hour enrollment hotline phone number is (682)313-6404 for any needs that arise outside of normal operating hours.

Tuition for the all of the nurse aide training programs at Legacy Healthcare Careers is $850, which is very competitive and rather affordable. Flexible payment plans are available that will surely fit into most prospective students’ budgets.

Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA school offers fast-track nurses aide programs that are designed to train prospective students for careers as nursing assistants within a few short weeks. All CNA classes offered at the school deliver high quality instruction in basic nursing care techniques. In addition, all of the CNA classes are taught by professional registered nurses (RNs) with extensive experience in nursing and direct patient care.

The nurse aide programs all consist of a proven blend of theory instruction that occurs in the classroom setting in addition to hands-on lab training. In addition, a clinical practicum externship training phase takes place at a local healthcare center in the Dallas/ Fort Worth area where students get the opportunity to practice hands-on procedural skills on actual patients and residents of the facility.

The nurse aide programs are structured and taught in strict accordance with the 100 hour Texas-approved state curriculum for nursing assistant training. In addition, the nurse aide coursework is taught with an overall focus of ensuring that graduates are able to pass the CNA state test on the first attempt.

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Moreover, graduates of Legacy Healthcare Careers receive full eligibility to take the Texas state examination to obtain certification as a certified nursing assistant (CNA). A career as a nursing assistant is loaded with fulfillment, steady pay, job security, the potential for lifelong learning, ultimate joy, challenging moments, and the ability to climb up the nursing career ladder.

In other words, CNA training in the Fort Worth area is a solid investment in an individual’s future career prospects. CNA training can quickly boost an individual’s relative value and overall demand in the local employment market. Some people are actually able to double their earning potential by becoming a nurse aide.

Daytime, evening and weekend class schedules are available to accommodate the busy personal schedules of prospective students who choose to enroll. The minimum age to enroll is 16 years of age with parental consent or 18 years old without consent. Also, no high school diploma or GED is needed to enroll as long as the prospective student has proof of an 8th grade education.

Jump-start your legacy today at Legacy Healthcare Careers. Feel free to visit the Legacy Healthcare Careers school website (www.LegacyHealthcareCareers.com) or the Legacy Healthcare Careers blog at www.LegacyHealthcareCareers.org for more information on the school’s CNA programs in the Fort Worth metro area.