International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking: June 26th

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The International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, a global observance that takes place on the 26th day of June during each year, was started back in 1987. The overall goal of the International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking is to increase awareness regarding the societal ills and other problems that often arise due to the use, trafficking and sales of illegal substances.

According to the International Narcotics Control Board (2018), the International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking is an annual reminder of the significance of worldwide efforts to prevent and alleviate suffering caused by drug abuse and  trafficking as well as the importance of assuring access to controlled substances for medical and scientific use.

Drug abuse and trafficking can be terribly destructive to individuals, families, schools, communities and societies as a whole. Drug use disorders are a major public health problem. Drug addiction is a dreadful disease process that destroys peoples’ health statuses, destabilizes families, places enormous burdens on the healthcare system and causes undue strains on the limited resources of various social services agencies.

Moreover, drug abuse and trafficking can be extremely detrimental to the safety and security of people, including those who become innocent victims that get caught in the crossfire. Drug trafficking, once seen primarily as a social and criminal issue, has been transformed in recent years into a massive threat to the health and safety of people and regions (United Nations Regional Information Centre for Western Europe, 2019).

Allied healthcare workers can have a beneficial influence on children and young people by providing education on the risks of illegal drug use, identifying risk factors, noticing risky behaviors and intervening in a timely manner to help prevent and/or treat substance abuse issues before they burgeon into more serious problems. Thus, people who work in the healthcare system are integral to the fight against illicit drugs.

REFERENCES

International Narcotics Control Board. (2018, June 26).  Message on International Day against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking. Retrieved June 24, 2019, from https://www.incb.org/incb/en/news/press-releases/2018/international-narcotics-control-board_-message-on-international-day-against-drug-abuse-and-illicit-trafficking.html

United Nations Regional Information Centre for Western Europe. (2019). The Secretary General — Message on the International Day Against Drug Abuse and illicit Trafficking. Retrieved June 24, 2019, from  https://www.unric.org/en/drugs/27032-the-secretary-general-message-on-the-international-day-against-drug-abuse-and-illicit-trafficking

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The Top Skills Needed to Work in the Healthcare Field

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Healthcare is a huge, vast industry in the United States. In other words, the healthcare industry is bursting at the seams with plenty of job openings that need to be filled. Furthermore, the majority of these positions come with perks such as steady pay, fringe benefits, flexible shifts, cool coworkers, excitement, and an invigorating sense of purpose that can only be derived from giving of oneself to help other people make it through their days with big smiles.

In essence, the healthcare field has the capacity to provide extremely good employment opportunities to millions of people in the United States because it is so very enormous. Many people in this country require direct care and other indirect services related to healthcare. Nonetheless, there are a number of top skills that people should either possess or work hard to develop if they are considering a healthcare career.

The following is a list and description of the general skills that are needed in order to be successful in the healthcare industry on a long-term basis. Astute readers should take note that none of these are hands-on procedural skills. After all, a person can be excellent when it comes to performing medical procedures while being totally awful to the people who require those same procedures to be performed on them.

The Top Five Skills Individuals Need For a Career in the Healthcare Industry

  1. Service orientation is a skill that is totally necessary to survive as a healthcare worker on a long-term basis. Service orientation is defined as a mindset that calls upon a person to actively seek ways to provide assistance (a.k.a. service) to others. A major aspect of working in the healthcare field is ensuring the provision of assistance to patients, their families and others. In a nutshell, healthcare workers deliver services to people.
  2. Communication skills are absolutely imperative for working in the healthcare field. Communication skills include verbal communication, which is the act of speaking and voicing things to other people to get one’s points and information across in an effective manner. Communication skills also involve nonverbal communication, which is the act of using body language, gestures, tone of voice, facial expressions, shrugging, eye movement and posture to convey messages.
  3. Observation is the skill of paying attention to and analyzing the behaviors of oneself and others with the ultimate goal of improving or making corrections as needed. Healthcare workers must continually observe their own actions; also, they observe patients, coworkers, supervisors, families, vendors, visitors and an array of other people. Thus, healthcare workers need to have a keen sense of observation.
  4. Active listening skills are very important to have in the healthcare industry. Active listening skills are the series of deliberate actions people take so they will be able to devote complete attention to what other persons are saying. Some examples of active listening skills include taking the time to comprehend the points individuals are attempting to make, questioning others as needed to gain more clarity, and not interrupting conversations at improper times.
  5. Social awareness is crucial when dealing with people as a healthcare worker. Social awareness can be defined as the skill of comprehending and appropriately responding to the reactions of others and their interpersonal struggles, as well as knowing why they may be reacting in that manner. A socially aware healthcare worker remains fully aware of his or her surroundings and correctly interprets the emotions and actions of the multitude of persons that he or she has met.

If you are in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, get a healthcare career in as quickly as two weeks at Legacy Healthcare Careers. Train to become a nursing assistant (CNA). Call (682)626-5266 to register for CNA classes at our state-approved school.

April: Alcohol Awareness Month!

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Alcohol is a substance that undeniably has a number of direct and indirect affects on the health system in the United States as well as around the world. Furthermore, April happens to be Alcohol Awareness Month. Due to the reality that alcohol has such a notably profound impact on all facets of the healthcare system, a posting about Alcohol Awareness Month 2019 seems timely and appropriate.

The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) created Alcohol Awareness Month in 1987 for the targeted purpose of spreading knowledge and awareness about the topics of alcohol, problem drinking, alcohol abuse, alcohol addiction, and recovery. In addition, Alcohol Awareness Month was created to lessen the stigma and negative connotations associated with addiction to alcohol.

Approximately 17.6 million persons are afflicted with alcohol use disorders or alcohol dependence (Facing Addiction With NCADD, 2019). As aspiring medical professionals and workers in the healthcare system, the likelihood of encountering patients and families impacted by alcohol abuse is high. Thus, healthcare workers should educate themselves about issues that revolve around alcohol misuse, alcoholism, and recovery.

To observe Alcohol Awareness Month, people can do their part by helping to spread some knowledge and awareness regarding alcohol usage. The various social media outlets such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram will surely be filled with informational posts, articles and pictures regarding Alcohol Awareness Month. Furthermore, people can utilize the #AlcoholAwareness hashtag when posting on social media apps.

Remember the following truths: even when an individual believes he or she is alone in the world, rest assured that someone is always around to offer help. Therefore, let’s be there to either provide help or obtain it if needed. After all, be mindful that it is never too late to make more healthful lifestyle changes and address addictions or problematic patterns. No one is alone in the uphill fight for a better, sober life.

REFERENCES

Facing Addiction With NCADD. (2019). Alcohol Awareness Month – April 2019. Retrieved April 12, 2019, from https://www.facingaddiction.org/resources/alcohol-awareness-month?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTmpReU5HTTRaakJtT1RJeSIsInQiOiJweWtJQjI4b0xUbVBrMDZvKzZGVmpVZVhtUE12NEpKRkI4aHo2azRZRkVZOE5OcnlNOFRrZkQrMWNna1wvQXdLWDQzT3o5YnNvMG40YlFzUTVFdjA5Nm9CWElWU3dEQlFjeHMzTWVwQjlZSVRrRENKeDdRbXhxcXNiTE5vam9WQThrOUNrMzQyVDlWcnRZUFwvQ2VNcWJudz09In0%3D

Healthcare Workplace Spotlight: Managing Difficult People

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No matter where we work, we will surely have encounters with difficult people. However, healthcare workplaces can be home to high-pressure environments that do not always bring out the very best in the individuals that work in them. Factors such as stress, snap decisions, illness, and organizational hierarchies can all contribute to disillusionment that may lead to difficult behaviors from some people.

Some healthcare workers might have the terrible misfortune of working with a condescending boss, control-freak supervisor, micromanaging chief nurse officer, whiny coworker, mean-spirited patients or their verbally abusive family members and visitors. Regrettably, these folks are all relatable characters that are intertwined in the day to day theatrics of the modern healthcare workplace.

Medical-oriented workplaces such as healthcare facilities can be intensely stressful, so it is not particularly shocking that this type of environment does not always bring out the most noble qualities in people. In addition, those who do work in the healthcare sector have probably experienced more than one instance in which the difficult conduct of coworkers or managers has resulted in hard feelings long after the offending event.

Without further delay, if a healthcare worker happens to have a coworker or boss who is horribly difficult to manage in the workplace, here is a list of tips to help cope with the situation.

  • Make sure you are not becoming part of the problem. It is okay to complain as long as you come up with solutions to the issues you complain about. However, be careful to avoid falling into the trap of becoming a whiny complainer.
  • Tactfully confront the difficult coworker. During the confrontation, state the facts without becoming overly emotional. Communicate as assertively as possible. Take care to not become aggressive or passive in this confrontation.
  •  Focus more on the behavior and less on the difficult person. In reality, people usually are not the core problem. In fact, their behaviors are the problem.
  • Be future-oriented. Do not dwell on past occurrences. Do not continually revisit a difficult coworker’s past. After all, difficult people cannot change the past. Rather, they can only make alterations to their future behaviors.
  • Manage your expectations of others. Ask yourself if your expectations are truly realistic. If your expectations of proper healthcare workplace decorum and behaviors are too lofty, you might need to adjust them accordingly.

Good luck to every healthcare worker who is dealing with the hot-button subject of difficult coworkers. Please be aware that you are not alone in the fight to manage peoples’ difficult behaviors and habits.

REFERENCES

Employee Development Systems. (2007). Dealing With Difficult People: Participant Workbook. Retrieved April 9, 2019, from http://www.employeedevelopmentsystems.com/media/pdfs/DealingWithDifficultPeople.pdf