Healthcare Workplace Spotlight: Personal Care Group Homes

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Entry-level healthcare workers can secure employment at a variety of facilities that offer direct care services, including group homes. A personal care group home, also referred to as a residential care group home, is a private house within a residential community that is staffed with direct care personnel who provide around-the-clock assistance with activities of daily living to small groups of four or more adult clients who live there.

Personal care group homes are generally set up to replicate homelike atmospheres that appeal to clients and families who prefer cozier environments and more personalized services than those offered by large corporate-owned nursing homes and franchise chain assisted living facilities. Instead of living with 120 other nursing home residents, a client at a personal care group home would have anywhere from three to nine housemates.

Most personal care group homes provide services such as meal preparation, laundry, transportation, housekeeping, medication administration, housecleaning and custodial care services. Custodial care is defined as non-medical direct assistance with activities of daily living such as showering, dressing, eating, grooming, toileting and mobility. Entry-level direct care workers who staff these group homes provide help with custodial care.

It is normal for personal care group homes cater to specific subgroups of clients. For instance, some group homes are only occupied by clients who are adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, whereas other homes have indigent clients who receive Medicaid. Still, some personal care group homes only accept financially secure elderly clients who are privately paying for their private or semi-private rooms with cash.

Most of the individuals who provide the direct custodial care to clients at personal care group homes are referred to as direct care workers. To become a direct care worker, a prospective candidate should have a high school diploma or GED, as well as valid state certification as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) or home health aide (HHA).

Even though it is possible to obtain a job as a direct care worker without a high school education or CNA certification, the rate of pay for this position will almost always be substantially lower without the aforementioned credentials. Therefore, it is advisable that entry-level healthcare workers obtain certification as a CNA prior to applying for positions as direct care members of staff at personal care group homes.

Call (682)626-5266 to enroll in two-week nurse aide (CNA) training classes at Legacy Healthcare Careers, a small vocational school in the Fort Worth area suburb of Richland Hills, Texas.

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March is Autoimmune Awareness Month

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The month of March is National Professional Social Work Month. In addition, March is National Nutrition Month. Since the professions of social work and nutrition are tightly interrelated with connections to the healthcare sector in a number of differing ways, a couple of previous posts had been devoted to these aforementioned month-long observations. Click here and right here to read these posts.

Well, March is also Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month. The whole purpose of Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month is to bring crucial awareness to the painful plights of the nearly 50 million individuals in America who are currently afflicted with autoimmune diseases. Many common illnesses such as type I diabetes, celiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and Crohn’s disease are autoimmune in origin.

An autoimmune disease is one in which a person’s bodily immune response begins to destroy perfectly healthy tissues and organ systems, leading to illness. Eustice (2018) asserts that an autoimmune disease is related to a malfunction of a person’s immune system, which results in the body attacking its own tissues. When the immune system malfunctions, the body sees its own tissues as foreign and attacks those tissues.

In addition, more than 100 autoimmune disease processes exist, and approximately 75 percent of afflicted persons are females. Some other common autoimmune diseases include Graves disease, psoriasis, vitiligo, inflammatory bowel disease, hemolytic anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile arthritis, vasculitis, Hashimoto’s disease, mixed connective tissue disease and autoimmune hepatitis.

Certain factors seem to place an individual at a greatly increased risk of developing an autoimmune disease process. Females of childbearing age, persons who belong to particular racial-ethnic backgrounds, people who have been exposed to certain triggers or environmental exposures, and individuals with a family history of autoimmune disease are at higher risk of developing an autoimmune response (Eustice, 2018).

According to Whitehill (2017), Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month provides the public with the optimal opportunity to continue to raise awareness of scleroderma, Raynaud’s disease and the multitude of other autoimmune-related health problems. In order for a widespread public health problem such as autoimmune disease to be solved, it must first be acknowledged and brought into peoples’ awareness on a large scale.

If autoimmune conditions receive more attention from the American public as well as deeply moneyed stakeholders such as large research universities and major hospital systems, financial investments in well-designed autoimmune disease research trials will most likely rise. The body’s autoimmune response definitely needs further investigation in order to find a cure and perhaps alleviate the suffering of millions of affected people.

More monetary investment in clinical and medical research is surely needed to enhance the day to day realities for those unfortunate individuals who are caught up in the midst of the autoimmune disease journey, as well as swifter access to innovative treatments (Whitehill, 2017). A blend of innovation, money, critical thinking, initiative, research trials and intense curiosity will be needed to fight the issue of autoimmune disease.

REFERENCES

Eustice, C. (2018, December 24). Autoimmune Disease Types and Treatment. Verywell Health. Retrieved March 10, 2019, from https://www.verywellhealth.com/what-is-an-autoimmune-disease-189661

Whitehill, N. (2017, March 7). Raising Awareness and Knowledge of Autoimmune Diseases for March. Scleroderma News. Retrieved March 10, 2019, from https://sclerodermanews.com/2017/03/07/raising-awareness-knowledge-of-autoimmune-diseases-for-march/

Healthcare Career Spotlight: the Nursing Facility Social Worker

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Firstly, social workers are educated professionals who assist people to meet unmet needs, address problems, and deal with various issues in their lives. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (2018), social workers work in a myriad of workplaces such as clinics, schools, social service agencies, hospitals, group homes, homeless shelters, settlement houses, community organizations, and private practices.

The main purpose of this posting is to bring light to the multifaceted role of the nursing facility social worker. The point of having a social worker in the nursing home setting is to ensure that the ongoing needs of the facility’s multiple residents are being met in a timely manner. In essence, nursing facility social workers contribute to residents’ socio-emotional well-being by working closely with them and their family members.

All nursing homes are required to have a comprehensive social service program to assure that each resident’s social and emotional needs get fulfilled. It is the social worker’s responsibility to assist in the oversight, operation, and staffing of the social services department at the nursing facility. In fact, some larger nursing homes utilize at least two social workers to manage all of the residents on their caseloads.

Social workers in nursing homes are responsible for doing admission assessments on newly admitted residents to determine their needs and make the transition to facility living easier. As soon as newly admitted nursing home residents adjust to life in the facility, the social worker involves them in the care planning process and participates in the plan of care for each resident as a member of the multidisciplinary team.

Nursing facility social workers might also complete tasks such as pre-admission screenings, provision of information on advance directives, do not resuscitate (DNR) forms, social histories, questionnaires, reviews of residents’ rights, appointment scheduling with external healthcare providers, quarterly assessments, progress notes, assistance with monetary matters, and referrals to outside professionals.

In addition to the admissions process, social workers are absolutely integral to residents’ discharge planning in nursing homes. In this sense, the discharge process may simply entail a transfer from one department (e.g., the skilled sub-acute rehabilitation wing of the nursing home) to another area, such as the long term care section of the same facility.

In the majority of other instances, a resident’s discharge involves a transfer to home, the hospital, a homeless shelter or another facility. In these types of discharges, the social worker would carefully assess the needs of the discharging resident and make arrangements to ensure that (s)he or the family is able to obtain certain goods and services that are needed once the discharge takes place.

Once the actual discharge is happening, the nursing facility social worker would assist the resident to acquire goods such as shower chairs, glucose meters, and other types of durable medical equipment (DME). The social worker would also set up important services, such as home health care, pharmacy delivery, outpatient physical therapy, community resources, and/or transportation. Social workers function as advocates.

In general, most nursing facility social workers work a full time schedule that consists of daylight hours. Furthermore, they must occasionally work evenings, weekends and holidays to catch up on their workloads. The vast majority of nursing home social workers work at a desk and have an office, although they must often visit residents and meet with families during care plan meetings.

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (2018) asserts that the employment of healthcare social workers is projected to increase by approximately 20 percent through the year 2026, which is notably faster than the average for all occupations. Nursing home social workers remain in steady demand because of the assistance they provide to aging residents and their families while they adapt to the institutional facility lifestyle.

REFERENCES

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. (2018). Social Workers. Retrieved from https://www.bls.gov/ooh/community-and-social-service/social-workers.htm#tab-1

February is Turner Syndrome Awareness Month

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February is Turner Syndrome Awareness month and, since this website definitely has an orientation toward the medical field and various issues that pertain to healthcare, this month-long observance deserves an honorable mention and a posting of its own. After all, the point is to raise some much-needed awareness regarding the rare disease process known as Turner Syndrome.

Turner Syndrome is a rather uncommon health problem that afflicts about one in every 2,500 females. This syndrome, which is not inheritable and affects only females, arises due to a chromosomal abnormality. It happens whenever all or part of of a girl’s second X chromosome is either completely or partially absent.

Turner Syndrome develops at the time of conception; in addition, approximately 99 percent of all Turner Syndrome pregnancies do not ever survive. In other words, a female infant who is born with Turner Syndrome has beaten the odds since the vast majority of women who are pregnant with Turner Syndrome babies do not carry them to full term due to fetal demise.

The visual, physical outcome of Turner Syndrome is a notable constellation of telltale signs and symptoms that can vary in severity from mild to profound. Girls with Turner Syndrome tend to present with the following characteristics: an unusually short stature, slower bone growth than usual, horseshoe-shaped kidneys, heart abnormalities, issues with hearing, enlarged hands and feet, and broadened chests and shoulders.

Other physical traits attributable to Turner Syndrome include webbed necks, deformed elbows, narrow palates, thin teeth and puffy extremities. In addition, girls with Turner Syndrome usually have absence of menstruation and suffer from infertility. A large number of females with Turner Syndrome have high blood pressure (hypertension), which is thought to arise due to kidney abnormalities and/or aortic constriction.

Due to the fact that February is Turner Syndrome Awareness Month, the overriding goal of this posting is to spread awareness about this disease process to as many members of the general public as humanly possible while also offering wholehearted support to the many parents of little girls afflicted with this disorder. Approximately 80,000 females have been diagnosed with Turner Syndrome in the United States to date.

Even though there is no known cure for Turner Syndrome at the time of this writing (2019), it is very much manageable when the female patient is placed under the care of a competent healthcare provider who is knowledgeable regarding its ongoing medical management.

REFERENCES

Martell, J. (2018). Raise Awareness of Turner Syndrome During the Month of February! Retrieved from https://patientworthy.com/2018/02/23/raise-awareness-turner-syndrome-month-february/

February is American Heart Month

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February happens to be the shortest month on the calendar. However, the shortest month in existence is still insanely busy. Multiple celebrations and observances are taking place during this vaunted winter month such as Black History Month, Turner Syndrome Awareness Month, and the National Children’s Dental Health Month. Furthermore, February is the official National Bird Feeding Month.

This is just a friendly, harmless reminder that February is also American Heart Month. To be more precise, here is a very brief history regarding American Heart Month. It is a one month long official observance that had been initially put into place by the federal government via title 36 of the United States Code more than a decade ago. Many people are not even aware of the existence of American Heart Month.

Can anyone who is reading this guess correctly what the number one cause of death is in the U.S.? If any readers had guessed that heart disease is the leading cause of death in this country, then their guess would have been absolutely correct. Since this website has a marked orientation toward healthcare careers and things pertaining to the medical field, a quick posting about American Heart Month seems timely and appropriate.

After all, many people in this country seek the services of the healthcare system as the result of heart disease and cardiac issues. In fact, there is a high likelihood that some or all of the current and future readers of this piece are either related to a person who has heart disease or know someone who is afflicted with heart disease. Heck, there is a decent chance that a reader may even have one or more cardiac issues themselves.

The overarching focal point of American Heart Month is to raise awareness in the minds of the American public about the national health crisis of heart problems and blood vessel, cardiovascular and circulatory disorders. In addition, another goal of American Heart Month is to get the general public to be more supportive of programs and initiatives that work toward addressing the rampant problem of heart disease.

Some of the most common cardiovascular health issues in this country include the following: coronary artery disease (CAD), congestive heart failure (CHF), hypertension (more commonly known as ‘high blood pressure’), atrial fibrillation, heart valve disease, and angina pectoris (better known as ‘chest pain’). Congenital heart defects and anomalies, which are present at birth, are also rather common in American society.

During American Heart Month, people are strongly encouraged to wear the color red to show their wholehearted support of preventative measures for heart disease. People are also nudged toward making a series of lasting lifestyle changes that have been proven to minimize or reduce the risk of developing heart problems.

Lifestyle changes that lessen the likelihood of cardiac disease development include smoking cessation, regular cardiovascular exercise, weight loss, stress management, and adherence to heart-healthy diets. American citizens are also urged to obtain annual physical examinations from a healthcare provider and ensure their serum cholesterol levels get checked regularly.

REFERENCES

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. (n.d.). American Heart Month. Retrieved from https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/education-and-awareness/heart-month

 

Healthcare Career Spotlight: the Chiropractic Assistant

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A chiropractic assistant, also known as a chiropractic medical assistant, is a multi skilled allied healthcare worker who performs a variety of administrative and clinical tasks to facilitate the routine day to day operations of chiropractic clinics and practices. Chiropractic assistants review patients’ customized treatment plans in order to render care and deliver specific healthcare services.

The primary function of the chiropractic assistant is to assist chiropractors in the provision of care to patients in outpatient healthcare settings such as specialty clinics, pain management practices, and chiropractic doctors’ offices. A chiropractic assistant provides hands-on patient care. In addition, chiropractic assistants complete a number of clerical tasks to ensure smooth functioning of chiropractic practices.

Chiropractic assistants perform clinical duties such as checking patients into the clinic or practice setting, rooming patients, measuring and charting body weight and height, obtaining health histories, and helping patients complete questionnaires and other forms as needed by the chiropractor. They observe patients and promptly report any unusual reactions to treatments and/or changes in patient status to the chiropractor.

In addition to the previously mentioned duties, chiropractic assistants obtain subjective health data including vital signs (blood pressure, temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate) for the chiropractor’s use in physical examinations and treatment plans. Chiropractic assistants also assist in other hands-on patient care tasks such as physiotherapy treatments, exercises and hot and cold therapies.

Moreover, chiropractic assistants carry out administrative front office tasks such as greeting people at the reception desk, confirming payer sources and medical insurance coverage, scheduling appointments, billing, filing paperwork, answering telephones, checking emails, navigating computer software systems, communicating with supply vendors, and maintaining the cleanly appearance of the waiting area.

The overwhelming majority of chiropractic assistants can be found working in places of employment such as multi specialty practices, chiropractor offices, pain management clinics, and personal injury chiropractic clinics. Chiropractic assistants work alongside chiropractors, x-ray technicians (radiographers), and other types of healthcare providers and allied health professionals.

Ideally, the chiropractic assistant needs to have superb communication skills and the ability to relate to patients from a variety of different backgrounds. They should possess a cordial personality and be knowledgeable about the ethical aspects of their role, including the principles of veracity (truthfulness) and confidentiality (the obligation to keep protected health information private).

In addition, a chiropractic assistant should know how to utilize appropriate body mechanics and have some physical strength due to the continual bending, frequent lifting, occasional twisting, and lengthy periods of time they may spend on their feet during a typical day at the workplace. They are expected to work under minimal supervision, make many decisions independently and be problem solvers.

Safety is fundamental in the role of a chiropractic assistant. They must handle patients with extreme care to prevent and avert avoidable injuries to themselves and the patients to whom they render direct care. Furthermore, chiropractic assistants always need to comply with standard precautions and infection preventative principles to ensure their patients remain safe.

To become a chiropractic assistant, an individual should be a high school graduate or GED recipient. Earning a diploma, certificate or associate degree in medical assisting can add legitimacy to a career as a chiropractic assistant and make the job search much easier. After attaining a diploma or degree in medical assisting, a person should take the extra step of obtaining national certification as a certified medical assistant.

Job market demand for chiropractic assistants is expected to be robust well into the future. Per the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, which places chiropractic assistants into the Medical Assistants employment category, the projected job growth rate for this allied healthcare professional role is an estimated 29 percent through the year 2026. This projected growth rate greatly exceeds the average of all other kinds of jobs.

The massive increase in population of the aging Baby Boomer population will continue to fuel the high demand for preventive and holistic healthcare services, which are often provided by chiropractors. Because of these reasons, chiropractors are expected to hire a larger number of chiropractic assistants to complete routinized administrative and clinical duties, enabling chiropractors to attend to more patients.

Legacy Healthcare Careers delivers affordable, quality, judgment-free healthcare job training to students in the Dallas /Fort Worth Metroplex area of Texas. Please call Legacy Healthcare Careers at (682)626-5266 or (682)313-6404 to enroll in one of our healthcare occupational training programs. Call today. Classes start very soon.

Scholastic Spotlight: The Clinical Externship Defined

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So, what exactly is an externship? Well, a clinical externship is an unpaid learning opportunity for students in schools of nursing, nurse aide (CNA) training programs, medical assisting training programs and other types of allied healthcare courses to facilitate full immersion in acquisition of hands-on practical skills in a particular sphere of interest.

Essentially, the clinical externship is the educational phase of most health science training programs that enables pupils to shadow more experienced allied healthcare workers in the specific career pathway that is being pursued. For instance, a nurse aide training program clinical externship would entail students shadowing more experienced nursing assistants as they provide basic patient care duties at a healthcare center.

During the clinical externship, the allied healthcare student works alongside more experienced healthcare workers in a workplace setting in the field or discipline of study. The student provides hands-on care to real clients under the supervision of a clinical instructor and is being evaluated for their performance the entire time. The student jumps in and assists clients with their patient care needs in a hands-on manner.

What can allied healthcare students look forward to during the clinical externship phase of their training? It can really differ depending on the specific type of training program. Each externship has its similarities and differences; however, a few commonalities do exist. The following list contains some potentially useful pearls of wisdom regarding clinical externships to assist in easing the student’s fears of the unknown.

  • The student’s clinical externship site or setting will depend on the training program he or she is enrolled in. For example, a medical assisting trainee might be assigned to a clinic or doctors office, whereas a nurse aide student will most likely be sent to a skilled nursing facility.
  • To make the most of the externship phase and maximize the learning experience, students should ask questions, be as helpful as humanly possible, and offer to provide assistance to the allied healthcare professionals at the clinical site. This is the student’s chance to shine and build a solid reputation in his or her future profession.
  • Students should always be ready to adhere to the predetermined rules of the clinical site. These rules might include standard workplace fare such as dress codes, hours of operation, social media usage policies, meal breaks, standards for professional conduct, proper chains of command, and so forth.
  • The clinical externship provides an amazing chance to learn new skills, as well as the opportunity to blossom both professionally and personally. It would be wise if the student adopts the stance that constructive criticism can pave the way for streamlined opportunities for improvement.
  • Keep in mind that the clinical instructor who supervises students at the clinical externship most likely has a vast amount of enriching experiences from school and work as a foundation to teach. Do not forget to utilize the clinical instructor as an educational resource. After all, they are there to help students acquire practical skills under supervision.
  • Clinical externships usually last anywhere from few days to several weeks depending on the requirements of the training program. In addition, the school’s administrative staff selects the clinical site location due to pre-existing contracts with healthcare facilities in the community where the school is located.
  • Students are usually graded and/or evaluated on their overall performance during their time at the clinical externship. In essence, the clinical externship is the student’s opportunity to thrive, bring positive attention toward oneself, and absorb mountains of new information in a practical manner. In other words, the clinical externship is full of awesome opportunities that should not go to waste.
  • As a general rule of thumb, allied healthcare students who are attending a clinical externship will not be paid for their time because it is a requirement for completion of the school’s training program. Time spent at the clinical externship site should be seen as schooling, not employment.

A clinical externship is a very important aspect of healthcare occupational training programs that students undergo in order to graduate and move on to thriving careers in the medical field. A clinical externship permits students to put multiple skills to use that are absolutely imperative for securing gainful employment in the healthcare field.

Call Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School at (682)626-5266 to obtain a rewarding career in the healthcare industry as a nursing assistant. The training programs offered by Legacy Healthcare Careers all involve clinical externships at local healthcare centers in the Dallas/Fort Worth area of Texas.

Healthcare Career Spotlight: the Restorative Nursing Assistant

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First of all, a restorative nursing program is an organized series of measures that promote the nursing home resident’s restoration of maximum potential and fosters the ability to live as safely as possible while maintaining independence through specific nursing interventions.  Restorative nursing programs revolve around the attainment and maintenance of maximal physical and psychosocial functioning.

A restorative nursing program aims to to maximize the independence of nursing facility residents by way of preservation of functional abilities, enhancement of self confidence, improvement in function, promotion of safety and the reduction of physical debility.  All goals, objectives and nursing interventions that are incorporated into any restorative nursing program need to be measurable and achievable.

A restorative nursing assistant, also known as a restorative nurse’s aide, is a multi-skilled allied healthcare worker who is trained in rehabilitative techniques and modalities that promote the capability of nursing facility residents to live as independently as possible while emphasizing the highest level of functional ability. Restorative nursing assistants adhere to the nursing home resident’s specific care plan to deliver restorative care.

The main function of the restorative nursing assistant is the provision of rehabilitative and restorative nursing care tasks to patients under the supervision of a licensed nurse. A restorative nursing assistant renders restorative interventions and a wide variety of therapy tasks to patients as delegated to them by the nurse who supervises the restorative nursing program.

Restorative nursing assistants are entrusted with carefully following each patient’s plan of care to assist them in performing active range of motion (AROM) exercises and passive range of motion (PROM) exercises to prevent contracture. The training and knowledge base of most experienced restorative aides enables them to function in their roles competently in a maintenance capacity if the therapist ever happens to be absent.

All restorative nursing services are delivered by restorative nursing assistants in strict accordance with the patient’s uniquely tailored plan of care. In addition to range of motion exercises, restorative nursing assistants also perform bowel and bladder training to aid in restoring urinary and bowel continence, help residents with ambulation (walking), and assist with self-help skills training.

Since restorative nursing programs also promote optimization of mental well-being, restorative nursing assistants might be delegated the tasks of reality orientation, remotivation and reminiscence therapy. Reality orientation therapy gets confused elderly residents to focus on immediate surroundings, whereas reminiscent therapy helps elders by stimulating past thoughts and memories.

Most restorative nursing assistants can be found working in places of employment such as long term care nursing facilities, acute care hospitals, outpatient rehabilitative clinics and specialty rehabilitation hospitals. Restorative nursing assistants work side by side with nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, physical therapy aides, occupational therapy assistants and speech language pathologists.

In general, the ideal restorative nursing assistant needs to have a warm personality and plenty of patience to deal with the elderly nursing facility residents to whom they provide care. Also, a restorative nursing assistant should be well versed in proper body mechanics and possess some physical strength as a result of the bending, heavy lifting, occasional twisting, and long periods of standing they do in a usual shift at work.

Safety is of the essence in the role of a restorative nursing assistant. They must manage and handle patients cautiously to prevent injuries to themselves or the residents under their care. In addition, restorative nursing assistants need to adhere to standard precautions and other basic infection control principles. Furthermore, restorative aides must document the care they provide and any interventions they carry out.

The role of restorative nursing assisting necessitates continual contact with people. Therefore, restorative nursing assistants must be exceedingly comfortable mingling with a wide variety of individuals such as patients, nursing facility residents, nurses, doctors, physical and occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, family members, nurse managers, coworkers, visitors and many others.

To become a restorative nursing assistant, an individual must complete a state-approved nurse aide training program and pass a state examination to obtain professional certification as a certified nursing assistant (CNA). After attaining CNA certification, an individual should amass at least six months of experience in the nursing specialties of acute rehabilitation or long term care.

All restorative nursing assistants are CNAs with specialized training in restorative care. The specialized restorative training can be obtained on the job at a place of employment that is willing to train the right candidate. In addition, CNAs with an interest in becoming restorative aides have the option of completing a formal seminar course to acquire the theoretical knowledge and skills to deliver restorative nursing care to patients.

Demand for restorative aides is projected to remain strong well into the foreseeable near future. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, which places restorative nursing assistants into the Nursing Assistants and Orderlies employment category, the projected job growth rate for this healthcare position is an estimated 11 percent through the year 2026. This projected growth rate exceeds the average for all other jobs.

The vast majority of growth in restorative nursing assistant job openings is the direct result of tens of millions of members of the Baby Boomer generation who are becoming elderly. Aging members of the Baby Boomer cohort have been entering the healthcare system at a steady rate and need restorative nursing care to maintain their levels of functional status. In essence, restorative nursing assistants are very much in demand.

Individuals in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex area of Texas should feel free to call Legacy Healthcare Careers at (682)626-5266 to jump-start an amazing career in the healthcare field. Legacy Healthcare Careers provides high quality, personable, affordable healthcare job training in addition to an array of job placement assistance services. Call Legacy Healthcare Careers today...