The Top Five Abilities Needed For a Career in Healthcare

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Many people know that healthcare is an enormous industry in the US as well as around the world. This essentially means that healthcare is home to a large number of job openings that must be filled with qualified candidates on a regular basis. Also, most of these jobs come with advantages such as steady income, benefits, flexible work schedules, great colleagues, and a refreshing sense of fulfillment that most people can only achieve from providing assistance to others in need.

Therefore, the healthcare and medical fields have the potential to offer lucrative job opportunities to masses of people on a tremendously massive scale. In addition, the majority of people will always require healthcare and medical services throughout the length of their lifespans. This is true with or without regard to peoples’ health statuses. Still, several defined abilities exist that persons would be wise to learn if they are seriously thinking about joining the ranks of the healthcare sector.

The following list contains some descriptions of the specific abilities that people need in order to succeed in healthcare and the medical field on a long term basis. Smart readers will soon recognize a very noteworthy pattern: none of these abilities are hands-on procedural skills. This is because a worker can be outstanding in the realm of performing medical procedures and, at the same time, act in an utterly horrid manner toward the same patients who need those procedures.

The Top Five Abilities People Need For a Career in the Healthcare Industry

  1. Problem Sensitivity is the ability of an individual to determine when something is wrong or is highly likely to go wrong. This ability does not have anything to do with actually working toward resolution of the problem. Rather, problem sensitivity only deals with accurate recognition of actual and potential problems. An example of a healthcare worker displaying problem sensitivity is a nursing assistant who recognizes that something might go terribly wrong when he sees a confused patient trying to pull out her IV line.
  2. Deductive Reasoning is the ability to move from generalizations to specifics in order to formulate solutions and solve problems in the workplace. For instance, a nurse might have generalized that people with good cardiovascular health work out routinely. The nurse then meets a 90-year-old lady in good cardiovascular health before using deducting reasoning to come up with the specific conclusion that this elder probably exercises routinely. The nurse uses deductive reasoning to design a fitness initiative in her community hospital.
  3. Inductive Reasoning is the ability to assemble specific bits of data and information to formulate general conclusions about occurrences in the workplace. An example of someone in the medical field using inductive reasoning is a clinic manager who notices that a certain medical assistant always arrives to work at 8:30am. This particular medical assistant is never late to work. The clinic manager comes up with the general conclusion that if the medical assistant continues to arrive at work at 8:30am, she will never be late to the workplace.
  4. Adaptability refers to one’s ability to deal with change, approach different situations as they arise, and work either alone or with other people as part of a team. The ability to adapt is a notably broad trait that most employers prefer workers to possess. In essence, adaptability is the ability to manage workplace changes and respond in a beneficial manner. Since the healthcare field is constantly evolving, healthcare workers must have the ability to adapt to changes.
  5. Prioritization is the ability of a person to properly rearrange workplace activities in order of importance relative to each other. In the context of the medical field, the ability to prioritize is crucial in clinical workplace settings that call upon workers to multitask. In these workplace environments, healthcare workers must juggle various priorities and figure out which tasks are most important during each workday. For instance, one patient’s complaint of chest pain must be prioritized over another patient’s request for pancake syrup.

Join the ranks of the healthcare field in just two weeks at Legacy Healthcare Careers by completing the two-week CNA training program. Call (682)626-5266 to enroll.

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