Scholastic Spotlight: the Importance of Classmates

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Classmates, also referred to as schoolmates, are defined as students who attend at least one of the same classes together at a particular school or educational institution. Classmates are important and can serve as amazingly valuable resources to a person’s future career pathway in the healthcare industry, albeit for a number of good reasons that might not be completely apparent at the first glance.

Why are classmates so valuable? Firstly, classmates can enlarge a person’s professional and personal network. Second, classmates are a great source of knowledge and wisdom. Third, classmates can make the time at school pleasurable. Fourth, classmates can be the ones to provide character references for jobs or college applications. Finally, classmates can help each other to learn the mountains of material being taught in school.

The majority of adult learners opt to go back to school or enroll in career training classes so they can acquire job skills that will make themselves more marketable and salable in the employment marketplace. In other words, people go back to school to increase the odds of getting better jobs for higher pay. Classmates can be a helpful part of a personal network since they may know of potential workplaces that have job openings.

Furthermore, classmates can bestow a lot of free knowledge and pearls of wisdom upon each other by way of sharing their life’s experiences, backgrounds, personal stories and work histories. For instance, the 48-year-old student with 25 years of home health care-giving experience can provide useful info to her classmates on the benefits and pitfalls of giving direct care to clients in a homelike residential workplace setting.

Also, friendly relationships with classmates can enhance the social experience at school. Aristotle said that human beings are social animals and therefore naturally seek the company of others as part of their well being (Cohen, 2010). Students often take pleasure in joining one another for coffee breaks, lunch time and class sessions. These friendly bonds may extend outside school and can last for many years after graduation day.

Do not forget about professional and personal references that a job seeker needs when applying to places of employment, educational programs and so on. Hiring managers and school program directors often request character references from people who can vouch for the applicant’s habits and goodness. When a former student keeps in touch with his classmates, they will be more likely to offer character references for him.

Finally, classmates can help each other learn the material that is being covered in school. Groups of students who attend the same class may form study groups to learn and retain the information. Also, classmates can share the techniques they use to study for quizzes, exams, hands-on skills and reading assignments. Some classmates exchange phone numbers and may call or text each other when they need help or clarification.

Classmates function in all sorts of useful ways. They boost the size of a student’s personal network and can help in the job hunt. They are full of free knowledge and pearls of wisdom, and can enhance the schooling experience. They may serve as much-needed character references and can help each other learn the material. Since classmates are so very useful, they are of the utmost importance during a student’s time in school.

REFERENCES

Cohen, E. (2010, September 21). You Are a Social Animal. Psychology Today. Retrieved March 24, 2019, from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/what-would-aristotle-do/201009/you-are-social-animal

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Scholastic Spotlight: the Art of Taking Notes

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We know. It is a widely known fact that not all pupils enjoy the tasks of writing or taking notes. To some students, writing and note-taking are tedious activities they would simply prefer to not do at all. On the other hand, note-taking is one of the most crucial actions students can take to promote their own active learning. This rings especially true for those enrolled in healthcare training programs and health science coursework.

Alas, a multitude of convincing reasons exist for the sheer importance of taking notes in school. Thus, for the sake of time, only the most significant rationale will be pointed out here: taking good quality notes tends to help students remember and recall important material that they would have otherwise forgotten. Recall and remembrance of crucial material is very essential when studying for quizzes, tests and the state exam.

To reiterate that point, taking notes is a really important task. This fact has already been established. However, taking notes correctly and efficiently is not always as simple a task as it appears to be on the surface. Good, effective note-taking does not just call upon students to write down every word the instructor or professor says in a haphazard way. In fact, effectual note-taking entails capturing main ideas in the student’s own words.

One recurrent theme most good students share is the fact that they adhere to a specific way of taking notes in class. A specific note-taking style assists students to focus and organize prior to class; in addition, it helps them effectively review and recall crucial concepts long after class has ended. Adhering to one note-taking style and sticking with it will help students pay attention during class while capturing important information.

Sticking to one specific style of taking notes has an array of other study-related benefits, too. For some students, it bestows more than enough motivation upon them to stay attuned to class discussions, pay close attention and participate in an active manner. It helps students reword their notes effectively so they do not lose focus of the main concepts and ideas once they start studying for final exams.

The following list provides an overview of the different styles of taking notes in school settings. It is advised to pick one method and try to stick with it unless another style of note-taking seems more suitable for the topic of study. Of course, now that this information is out here, students may take it and utilize it as they wish. Students are also totally free to avoid using any of this information at their own peril).

  • Flow-Based Note Taking Style: a way of taking notes in which the pupil writes down the main concepts instead of verbatim paragraphs and sentences. The student connects the written notes and concepts by drawing arrows, boxes and diagrams to link them together as interrelated ideas.
  • The Cornell Note Taking Style: a method of taking notes that organizes class topics of discussion into easily memorable summaries. This style works since the main concepts and summaries are all written in one place. In the Cornell Method, the note paper is divided into 3 sections: a 2.5” margin to the left, a 2” summary section on the bottom, and a main 6” in-class note section.
  • The Bullet Point Style: this is a method of taking notes that involves simply jotting down each noteworthy detail as a bullet point sentence. This style of note-taking works particularly wonderful for capturing important points in class discussions that are moving along quickly, as wells as fast-paced lectures that are filled with a great deal of information.
  • The Outline Style: this method is, in all likelihood, the most popular way to take notes in schools. This style of note-taking involves an outline to organize the noted material in a structured, logical manner that forms somewhat of a skeleton of the textbook chapter or lecture subject and serves as a wondrous study guide when preparing for tests (Missouri State University, n.d.).

REFERENCES

Missouri State University. (n.d.). Outlining Method for Note Taking. Retrieved March 16, 2019, from https://www.missouristate.edu/assets/busadv/p.24.pdf

Friendly Reminder: CNA School Open Enrollment Event Today, 3/13/2019 2:00 to 5:00pm (English & Spanish CNA Classes)

March Open Enrollment

This is just a friendly reminder regarding the Open House /Open Enrollment event that has been scheduled to take place today at Legacy Healthcare Careers, a small vocational school with a campus location in the Mid Cities area directly between Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas. This informal Open House /Meet & Greet event is scheduled to occur this afternoon, March 13, 2019 between the hours of 2:00 pm and 5:00 pm.

The school is located at 7100 Boulevard 26, Suite 205, Richland Hills, Texas 76180, near the intersection of Highway 26 and Glenview Drive. The school’s office is located on the second floor and it is accessible by either an elevator or two staircases. Also, parking is free. It would be greatly appreciated to call either (682)313-6404 or (682)626-5266 to RSVP to confirm your attendance prior to the event. Walk-in attendees will also be welcomed.

Light refreshments, snacks and beverages will be available to attendees on a first come /first serve basis. In addition, an informal meet & greet session with the nursing assistant training program instructors will take place to ensure that potential students’ questions are satisfactorily answered. Two certified nursing assistant (CNA) training classes, one in English and the other in Spanish, will start on Monday March 18, 2019.

Both of these are two-week CNA training programs that begin on March 18th and end on April 1st. The classroom schedules have been designed specifically to accommodate adult students who work full time and have other obligations. The schedules have also been carefully crafted to ensure students graduate quickly while learning as much as possible to ensure solid preparation for the local DFW healthcare employment market.

Since this is an Open Enrollment event, prospective students should arrive prepared by bringing a picture ID, social security card, and a $200 down payment to reserve a seat in one of the upcoming March 18th CNA training programs. Proof of prior education such as a high school diploma, GED, college degree, high school or college transcripts, report card or evidence of attainment of an 8th (eighth) grade education is also required.

Legacy Healthcare Careers provides an array of support services to current students and graduates such as job placement assistance, resume and cover letter preparation, hands-on procedural skills practice and so much more. Legacy Healthcare Careers is a small school with approval to operate from the Texas Workforce Commission and the state Department of Aging and Disability.

All of the healthcare training programs offered by Legacy Healthcare Careers are very affordable as well as fast track.

 

Why Would Anyone Become a Medication Aide /Medication Technician?

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A medication aide, also referred to as a medication technician or assistive medication administration personnel (AMAP) in a handful of select U.S. states, is an allied healthcare worker whose primary responsibility is administering non-injectable prescription and over-the-counter medications to clients.

Medication aides work under the oversight of registered nurses, licensed practical /vocational nurses (LPNs /LVNs) and other members of managerial staff to set up, administer and observe the effects of clients’ medications. Medication aides also report changes in clients’ health conditions and might also be responsible for requesting reorders of prescription drugs per company policies and procedures.

Medication aides are typically found working in post-acute healthcare workplaces such as skilled nursing home facilities, personal care group homes, intermediate care facilities, assisted living facilities, retirement centers, correctional facilities, and schools. Generally, medication aides secure employment in non-hospital healthcare settings due to local regulations.

So, why would any person become a medication aide in this day and age? Well, the advantages of working as a medication aide are definitely worth mentioning. The role of a medication aide is associated with a number of tangible and intangible perks. Without further ado, keep reading to find out about the wonderful advantages of becoming a medication aide.

REASON ONE: The role of a medication aide can be incredibly fulfilling.

One of the main reasons people opt to become a medication aide is that a career in the healthcare industry can be enormously rewarding. The reality that a medication aide will work alongside other persons as a very important part of the healthcare team can produce powerful feelings of joy. In addition, the fulfillment is something intangible that the medication aide can take extreme pride in.

Medication aides also communicate with clients, thereby being in a position to put a smile on their faces or ease their anxieties. The knowledge that one person can make a positive impact by contributing to various clients’ well-being while possibly even prolonging their lives with timely medications makes the role of the medication aide meaningful and fulfilling.

REASON TWO: Flexible work schedules are available for medication aides.

Since healthcare facilities are in operation 24 hours per day, medication aides are often able to select the work schedules they would like to work. A medication aide with school-aged children can work the 7:00 am to 3:00 pm day shift while the kids are in school. Likewise, a medication aide who is single and into the party scene can work the 2:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. shift, enabling him or her to get off work in time to go to the club or visit late night parties.

Furthermore, the weekend double shift is an option at some facilities. Weekend work appeals to medication aides who attend school full-time during the week or simply have a preference for enjoying all their weekdays off in a row. Finally, many people are nocturnal late owls who prefer to sleep during the day while working all night. Many medication aides work the overnight shift due to 24-hour work scheduling.

REASON THREE: The working conditions of most medication aides are comfortable.

The workplace environments of most healthcare workers, including medication aides, are comfortable due to predetermined standards of cleanliness. Most individuals who work in the healthcare sector report to places of employment that are cleaned on a routine basis per protocol by housekeeping, as well as climate-controlled to promote comfort for workers, clients, family members, vendors and visitors.

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In the very near future, Legacy Healthcare Careers plans to offer a brand new certified medication aide training program to prospective students in the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area who are employed as CNAs or direct care staff workers. Call (682)626-5266 for more details.

The staff of Legacy Healthcare Careers is in the initial phases of abiding by the varied regulatory steps connected with the addition of the certified medication aide classes to the school’s current nurse aide course offerings. More details will be added as the development of the certified medication aide training program reaches completion time.

 

Medication Aide /Medication Technician Practice Test Questions (Part One)

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Graduates of approved medication aide training programs must take and pass a state test called the Medication Aide Certification Examination, abbreviated as MACE for short, in order to receive a state-issued practice permit as a certified medication aide. In most states, the MACE typically consists of 100 test questions that directly pertain to safe medication therapy.

The best way to prepare for the MACE is to repeatedly answer medication aide practice test questions prior to sitting for the state exam. To prepare for this exam, a student should answer multiple practice test questions on a daily basis because repetition is the key to retaining the knowledge. In addition to answering test questions every single day, students should also review the rationales behind each answer.

QUESTION: What reason(s) should medication aides obey the six rights of medication administration each time medications are administered?

A. Recent changes might have been made on the dosage of the medication

B. Recent changes may have been made on the time the medication is to be given

C. Recent changes may have been made on the route the medication is to be given

D. All of the above

ANSWER: D

RATIONALE: Safe medication therapy involves checking the six rights of medication therapy each time medicines are administered. The six rights of medication administration include the following: 1) right patient 2) right medication 3) right dose 4) right route 5) right time, and 6) right documentation.

Due to the fact that a patient’s medication orders, times, dosages and routes often change at the physician’s discretion, adherence to the six rights of medication administration ensures patient safety in the realm of medication therapy. In addition, doctors often hold or discontinue medications, so the prudent medication aide would review the six rights of medication administration to avoid giving a medicine that the patient is no longer supposed to receive.

QUESTION: During the routine end-of-shift counting of controlled drugs, the medication aide notices that 10 pills of Xanax (Alprazolam) are missing from a prescription pill bottle. No one knows why the pills are missing. Which action should the medication aide take next?

A. Notify the charge nurse

B. Document the 10 pills as having been administered to a patient

C. Notify the administrator of the facility

D. Do nothing at the moment since 10 pills is not a large shortage

ANSWER: A

RATIONALE: The medication aide should notify the charge nurse each time the end-of-shift controlled drug medication count is inaccurate. This is true whether there is a shortage or overage of controlled medication. Controlled drugs are regulated by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). Additionally, the charge nurse knows the facility policies and procedures on how to proceed if the controlled medication drug count is not accurate.

It is not usually necessary to notify the facility administrator of issues relating to controlled medications. A medication aide who falsely documents the missing pills as having been given to a patient is engaging in falsification of medical records since the medication administration record (MAR) is an official medical record.

QUESTION: The medication aide is supposed to administer Metoprolol Tartrate (Lopressor) once per day at 8:00 a.m per the doctor’s order. The medication order has parameters to “hold if the pulse is less than 60.” The patient’s pulse is 55 this morning. What action should the medication aide take next?

A. Administer it anyway since a pulse of 55 is close enough to 60

B. Hold the medication and document it

C. Hold the medication, document it and immediately notify the patient’s nurse

D. Hold the medication, document it, and recheck the patient’s pulse to see if it reaches 60 beats per minute later in the morning

ANSWER: C

RATIONALE: It is common for some doctors to include vital sign parameters when ordering cardioactive medications that affect the heart rate and/or blood pressure. If the patient’s heart rate or blood pressure readings are less than the parameters associated with a medication order, the medication aide should hold the medication, document the action, and immediately notify the nurse.

Administering the medication could harm the patient by adversely affecting the heart rate. The prudent medication aide would not simply hold a medication and just document it without notifying the nurse because a low pulse may or may not signify a change in the patient’s usual condition.

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How to Become a Medication Aide, a.k.a Medication Technician

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A medication aide, also known in some states as a medication technician or assistive medication administration personnel (AMAP), is an important member of the healthcare team who has been trained to provide skilled assistance to registered nurses and licensed practical / vocational nurses in the realm of medication therapy.

In essence, medication aides are entrusted with the safe administration of nonparenteral drugs to patients and residents in a wide variety of healthcare settings outside the acute care hospital. Medication aides have received the pharmacological knowledge and practical training to assist licensed nursing staff by administering medications to patients and residents.

The main duty of a medication aide entails the safe, prudent administration of nonparenteral medications to patients. In most states, medication aides are permitted to distribute oral, topical, transdermal, eye and ear medicines to patients under the supervision of licensed nursing staff (LPNs/ LVNs and RNs). Medication aides also communicate with patients and residents, document all medications they have administered, report changes in patients’ conditions to nurses, and obtain vital signs.

Medication aides are typically employed in workplace settings such as nursing homes, extended care facilities, intermediate care facilities, personal care group homes, assisted living facilities, schools and correctional facilities. Due to rules and regulations that exist in most states, virtually all medication aides must have prior patient care experience as certified nursing assistants (CNAs) or unlicensed direct care staff workers.

To be able to enroll in most medication aide training programs across the United States, prospective students will need to be at least 18 years of age by the first day of class. Prospective students must also possess a high school diploma or general education diploma (GED) and provide evidence of current employment as a CNA or unlicensed direct care staff person before the first day of school.

In many states such as Missouri, the medication aide program consists of a minimum of 60 hours of classroom instruction along with 8 hours of clinical practicum training at a nursing facility. On the other hand, the requirements to complete a medication aide program in Texas are much more stringent: 100 hours of classroom instruction, 30 hours of return skills demonstrations and 10 hours of hands-on clinical practicum training.

The medication aide program coursework consists of instruction in a variety of topics such as medical terminology, fundamental review of systems of the human body, medicinal effects on each body system, principles of infection control, and different medication classifications. The overriding point of the medication aide program curriculum is to equip students with enough knowledge to administer medications in the safest manner possible.

Graduates of medication aide programs must also take and pass a written medication aide examination in the state where they intend to work. The medication aide test normally consists of 100 multiple choice questions that assess the test taker’s knowledge of medication therapy. Adequate preparation for the medication aide test is of the utmost importance. After all, who wants to fail this important test and be forced to retake it?

Graduates who pass the written medication aide test will be awarded a practice permit or state certification as a certified medication aide. This certification enables the medication aide to legally secure employment in a variety of healthcare settings for higher wages than those typically earned by CNAs and direct care workers. Moreover, the working conditions of medication aides tend to be less physically grueling than those endured by CNAs and direct care workers.

Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School is excited to announce the planned opening of a medication aide program to prospective students who live and work in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex of Texas. Please place a telephone call to Legacy Healthcare Careers at (682)626-5266 for additional information. More updates will be provided to the public as the medication aide program progresses further along in its nascent development.

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Certified Medication Aide Training Program Coming Soon to the Fort Worth / Mid Cities Area!

 

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The staff of Legacy Healthcare Careers LLC CNA School is extremely pleased to announce the planned addition of a certified medication aide training program to the school’s high-quality nursing assistant course offerings. The addition of a certified medication aide program to the Fort Worth and Mid-Cities area is welcomed news to prospective students who would prefer to avoid an inconvenient commute to faraway cities for their career training needs.

The Fort Worth / Mid-Cities area certified medication aide training program is scheduled to start accepting new students for class enrollments during the early months of 2019. Additional information regarding specific class start dates will be released as the program progresses further in its nascent development.

The predominant purpose of the certified medication aide training program is to prepare individuals who are already employed as nursing assistants or direct care members of staff for higher-paying positions in the healthcare industry as certified medication aides in nursing homes, intermediate care facilities, group homes, assisted living, or skilled care nursing facilities.

The certified medication aide program has been formulated to teach students basic skills in the safe, prudent administration of non-parenteral medications. The ultimate goal of the certified medication aide program is to qualify graduates to administer medications in a safe manner and to assist licensed practical /vocational nurses (LPNs / LVNs) and/or professional registered nurses (RNs) in the important task of medication therapy.

The certified medication aide course of study in Texas is comprised of a minimum of 140 clock hours of targeted instruction. The 140 clock hours can be broken down into 100 classroom theory hours of instruction and training, 30 hours worth of return-demonstration lab coursework, and a minimum of 10 hours of hands-on clinical skills practicum at a healthcare facility under the direct supervision of a state-licensed RN instructor.

The medication aide training program is comprised of focused schooling in the following topics: basic review of bodily systems and the effects of various medications on these systems; medical terminology; principles of infection control; and drug classifications. All certified medication aide lessons at Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School will be taught by experienced registered nurse (RN) instructors.

Graduates of certified medication aide training programs in Texas must take and pass the written medication aide examination, which contains 100 multiple-choice questions that assess the test taker’s knowledge base regarding safe, accurate, prudent medication therapy (Texas Health and Human Services, n.d.).

Once the medication aide examination is passed, the candidate receives a practice permit as a certified medication aide (CMA). The CMA practice permit enables the nurse aide to secure employment as a certified medication aide at nursing homes, skilled nursing facilities, extended care facilities, intermediate care facilities, correctional facilities, assisted living settings and personal care group homes.

For any questions regarding the upcoming certified medication aide program that will be offered at the Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School campus near Fort Worth, please call (682)626-5266 or telephone the 24-hour hotline at (682)313-6404. The friendly members of staff will answer any questions you may have to the very best of their abilities.

Keep in mind that Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School also continues to offer affordable, high-quality certified nursing assistant training classes with flexible schedules that enable prospective students to keep their jobs while obtaining occupational nurse aide training. Place a telephone call to (682)626-5266 to enroll in the certified nursing assistant program at Legacy Healthcare Careers.

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RESOURCES

Texas Health and Human Services. (n.d.). Medication Aide Program FAQs. Retrieved from https://hhs.texas.gov/doing-business-hhs/licensing-credentialing-regulation/credentialing/medication-aide-program/medication-aide-program-faqs