Beware of Online CNA Classes

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Due to today’s increasingly busy lifestyles, a lot of potential career-changers look for online coursework as a convenient way of transitioning into a new occupation or line of work. Moreover, healthcare career training seems to be popular with many busy folks who want to enroll in online courses. As an example, people want to become certified nursing assistants (CNAs), so they specifically seek out online CNA classes.

Nevertheless, here is a word of caution: a person cannot become a CNA online in most states. Let’s repeat that phrase using slightly different words: people are not legally permitted to become CNAs online in most US states. In fact, out of 50 states, Florida is the only one that allows students to skip the classroom and clinical externship associated with nurse aide training by challenging the state board to become CNAs.

Most online CNA programs advertised on the internet are flagrant scams designed to separate uninformed, unsuspecting and aspiring career-changers from hard-earned dollars. For instance, most states require at least 75 hours of face-to-face schooling in order to become a CNA. This 75 hours is normally built into a training program made up of 59 hours of class time and 16 hours of clinical externship at a nursing facility.

One glaringly obvious reason exists for face-to-face classroom and clinical training requirements in order to become a CNA: a person cannot learn how to properly take care of patients with online classes alone. In other words, students actually need to work with real patients at healthcare centers, touch them, talk, and interact with them while practicing basic nursing skills. These things can’t be accomplished online.

Direct hands-on care is the only tried-and-true method of learning to become a CNA. A person cannot learn how to provide direct patient care by simply reading online lessons and studying the lecture notes that come with a distance course. Learning to give basic nursing care involves a deliberate blend of seeing, doing and showing, and these methods can only be taught to nurse aide students in person in a face to face setting.

Most people’s lifestyles are really busy due to working, raising kids and managing other obligations that suck up more than enough time to fill our days with never-ending tasks. Thus, it is no surprise that many individuals search for online CNA classes out of a dire need for convenience. However, people cannot become CNAs totally online in the vast majority of states in the US. If it seems entirely too good to be true, maybe it is.

The truth hurts at times. Nonetheless, the getting the truth out there onto the center of the stage is necessary if reading or hearing realistic information saves people from being scammed out of their precious money. The cold, hard truth is that online CNA programs do not exist in most states, although a limited number of courses can be taken via online or distance formats in some areas. Forewarned is forearmed, so good luck.

People in the Dallas-Fort Worth area of Texas who are in need of nurse aide (CNA) training classes can call Legacy Healthcare Careers at (682)626-5266. Fast-track day, night and weekend CNA classes are offered here. Graduate in two weeks with a new career in the medical field.

 

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How Does the Opioid Epidemic Affect the Healthcare Field in the United States?

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The opioid epidemic, also known as the opioid crisis, first gained serious traction in the United States during the 1990s decade due to a number of momentous factors such as a marked increase in the number of pain killer prescriptions along with the fiercely addictive qualities of these medications. Also, big name pharmaceutical companies started to aggressively market and advertise opioid prescription drugs in the 1990s.

Unfortunately, the opioid epidemic has been having an awful impact on numerous individuals, their families, American society, and the healthcare field as a whole over the course of the previous two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2018), the number of overdose deaths involving prescription opioid drugs has been on a noticeable rise since 1999 with no slowdown in sight.

So, in what ways does the opioid epidemic affect the healthcare field in the U.S.? Well, people from all walks of life are addicted to opioids, so this epidemic has most certainly impacted many of the patients, coworkers and visitors who are participants in the healthcare system. The following list consists of the various ways in which the current opioid crisis has affected the healthcare field.

  • Impaired healthcare workers and providers: Many physicians, nurses, technicians and other allied healthcare workers have battled fierce addictions to opioids. Some healthcare professionals have even had their professional licenses and/or certifications revoked due to impaired practice or an inability to conquer their addictions. Other healthcare workers have entered drug rehab or chemical dependency programs.
  • Treatment of overdose: There has been a sharp increase in the number of addicted patients who are entering the healthcare system by way of rolling into hospital emergency departments on stretchers after having suffered opioid overdoses. In some regions, overburdened emergency medical service providers regularly deal with shortages of Narcan, the injectable medication that reverses the effects of opioid overdose.
  • Drug rehabilitative services: Some people enter the healthcare system by opting to receive inpatient drug rehab or participate in chemical dependency programs to battle their addictions to opioids. The number of health insurance plans that cover some or all of the costs associated with drug rehab or chemical dependency treatment has grown larger. Thus, many addicted persons are fighting their addictions by using these avenues.
  • Treatment of chronic disease processes: Still, some patients end up in the healthcare system for treatment of chronic hepatitis C, HIV and other bloodborne illnesses after contracting these viruses by using unclean hypodermic needles to inject opioid drugs. Many people who inject heroin were once users of prescription opioid pain pills. However, an alarming number of these folks switched to heroin since it is cheaper and delivers the same type of high.
  • Pain management clinics: Physicians who work in the specialty of pain medicine can earn very lucrative incomes due in part to the opioid epidemic. A pain doctor is a medical physician (M.D.) or doctor of osteopathy (D.O.) who specializes in pain medicine. Pain management clinics, referred to as ‘pain clinics’ for short, are doing brisk business as a result of the number of drug-seeking patients who visit them to request prescriptions and refills for opioid medications.
  • Impaired family members and visitors: Nurses, nursing assistants, patient care technicians and other healthcare workers who deliver direct patient care at the bedside must occasionally deal with visitors who are obviously impaired. Almost any experienced healthcare worker can describe the so-called ‘opioid nod’ with stunning accuracy because they have seen so many family members nodding off while visiting with hospitalized patients.
  • Infants born to addicted mothers: Newborns who are exposed to opioids during the prenatal period begin to experience severe withdrawal symptoms within 48 to 72 hours after birth. This heartbreaking phenomenon is referred to as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Moreover, the number of infants being born with neonatal abstinence syndrome has been increasing steadily due to the large number of pregnant women who abuse opioid drugs.
  • Lost productivity: The opioid crisis is putting a burdensome strain on employers and corporations, including many healthcare companies. The steepest monetary costs linked with the opioid epidemic arise mainly due to lost productivity and earnings losses for corporations. Untimely overdose deaths and opioid addiction disorders also affect municipal, county, state and federal governments in a detrimental manner by way of losses in tax revenue.
  • Staggeringly high healthcare costs: Healthcare costs connected with the opioid epidemic have exceeded $200 billion since 2001. These expenses are primarily due to pre-hospital emergency medical services (a.k.a. ambulance care), visits to local emergency departments, and the widespread use of Narcan, a medication that rapidly reverses the effects of opioid overdose. Also, opioid addicts cost their employers approximately twice as much in healthcare expenses when compared to their non-addicted workmates.

Completely Online CNA Programs: A Word to the Wise

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Let’s address this complicated issue head-on: modern day life is ridiculously busy! Most busy adults are juggling employment, family time, a social life and other aspects of their lives to strike some sort of balance. These time-consuming facets of life do not leave all that much time to attend school full-time, especially in a classroom setting.

After all, who has time to sit in a classroom for several hours per day? After working hard for eight to twelve hours all day long, does any sane person really want to spend the rest of the evening or all weekend long in a classroom setting? Most people would rather be at home where they can wind down, chill out, relax, eat a home-cooked meal or spend a few precious hours with the ones they love the most.

However, many people are unsatisfied with their current jobs. Some people may even hate their jobs with a passion! Therefore, the thought of returning to school to prepare for a career change has often crossed their minds. While these folks may mentally dance with the idea of going back to school, the reality of it often involves giving up multiple evenings or weekends to spend time in a classroom. Again, who really has time for that?

Ah, but there appears to be a solution that can be integrated into peoples’ busy lifestyles: online classes! In addition, many people want to enter the nursing profession due to the potential of steady pay and abundant job opportunities, so they search the internet for online healthcare career programs that can be completed in the comfort of one’s home.

Here is a word to the wise. Regardless of any fancy advertisements you may have seen, you cannot become a nurse completely online. You cannot become a CNA completely online. In fact, no state board of nursing in existence will allow students to become nurses totally online for one very simple reason: no one can truly learn to provide hands-on nursing care to patients without actually touching any patients.

The large number of online nursing degree programs that are advertised on the internet have been designed for people who are already licensed nurses (LPN or RN). These online nursing programs allow licensed nurses to pursue higher education and earn additional nursing degrees from a college or university while keeping their full time jobs.

For instance, an RN with an associates degree can complete an online bachelor of science degree in nursing (BSN). However, she first had to complete her associates of science degree in nursing (ASN) face to face in a class setting before qualifying for admission to the online BSN program. All state boards of nursing require nursing students to amass a certain number of classroom and clinical practicum hours in order to graduate.

Think about it. Would you want a nurse with no patient care experience whatsoever to take care of you or your loved ones? A nurse whose only schooling was online classes never received hands-on training in patient care. All nurses must complete a clinical practicum externship that entails spending many hours in hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare settings where they learn to provide hands-on care to real patients.

It is a similar situation with nursing assistant training. For instance, the state of Texas requires prospective nurse aides to complete a 100-hour CNA program that is comprised of 60 class and return demonstration lab hours as well as 40 clinical externship hours. This clinical externship occurs in a healthcare facility where students deliver hands-on care to patients. This is how nurse aide students learn to become CNAs.

In a nutshell, completely online CNA programs do not exist, at least in the state of Texas where 100 hours of face to face instruction are required. If something seems too good to be true, it probably is. The goal of this piece is to help readers and prevent them from being scammed by unscrupulous online businesses that claim to offer online CNA school. If this posting helps just one student out there, it will have been worth it to us.

Do you have the motivation to change your career? The 7-day CNA program at Legacy Healthcare Careers offers state-approved career training to become a nursing assistant in approximately one week. Call (682)626-5266 to enroll at Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School now! Classes start soon.

Nursing Career Ladder in the United States (Part Two): the Licensed Practical Nurse, a.k.a. Licensed Vocational Nurse (LPN / LVN)

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This post shall be the second in a four-part series that aims to shed some much-needed light on the illustrious nursing career ladder in the United States. Although the certified nursing assistant (CNA) remains the robust foundation of the nursing career ladder in the United States, the licensed practical nurse deserves a markedly special place on a rung of the very same ladder.

A licensed practical nurse, better known as an LPN, is a trained nurse who delivers basic nursing care duties under the direct and indirect supervision of registered nurses and/or physicians. Basic trained nurses in the US states of California and Texas are known as licensed vocational nurses, or LVNs. In fact, LPNs and LVNs are exactly the same type of nurse, but geographical location and local custom has dictated that their titles differ.

Throughout many instances in the lengthy history of the US healthcare system, LPNs have been respectably referred to as the eyes and ears for RNs and physicians. In the settings where they customarily work, LPNs have the tendency to spend more hands-on time delivering direct care and face to face contact to their patients than both RNs and doctors.

LPNs deliver direct nursing care duties that normally include important tasks such as medication administration, observation, data collection, vital sign acquirement, wound care, charting and documentation, dressing changes, supervision of nurses aides, maintenance of ostomies and feeding tube sites, prompt reporting of significant changes in patient status, measurement of inputs and outputs, and urinary catheter care.

To become an LPN / LVN, a prospective candidate must successfully complete a state approved practical nursing program. Completion of a state-approved practical nursing program generally takes about 12 to 18 months from start to finish. In the states of California and Texas, these programs are referred to as vocational nursing programs.

Practical and vocational nursing programs can be found in a diversely interesting variety of educational institutions such as community colleges, trade schools, private academies, and technical colleges. Practical and vocational nursing programs are also offered at many adult education centers, regional occupational programs (ROP), career training schools, and state universities.

Admissions requirements tend to vary depending on the type of institution and the competitiveness of the specific program. Generally speaking, practical nursing programs with the most affordable tuition attract more applicants, so admissions at the schools with the cheaper LPN programs are usually more competitive.

Also, practical nursing programs with excellent reputations in the local community often have competitive admissions processes because since students want to be associated with reputable schools. On the other hand, LPN/LVN programs that are owned and operated by for-profit corporations will usually have far less competitive admissions requirements due to factors such as high-priced tuition and issues with reputability.

The practical / vocational nursing graduate will also need to successfully pass a national licensing exam in order to secure a state license as an LPN / LVN. The name of this national licensing exam is the NCLEX-PN, and it is offered in all 50 U.S. states. Moreover, LPNs /LVNs can utilize a process called endorsement to obtain nursing licensure in additional states.

LPNs / LVNs can be found employed at nursing homes, hospitals, clinics, physicians offices, hospices, home health companies, private duty cases, blood banks, psychiatric facilities, camp sites, and physical rehabilitation centers. LPNs also work at schools, employee health centers, jail intake centers, prison infirmaries, the military, and same-day surgery suites.

Be on the lookout for the third post in this informative four-part series on the United States nursing career ladder. Also, place a telephone call to the Legacy Healthcare Careers campus at (682)626-5266 or call the 24-hour hotline at (682)313-6404 to enroll in affordable fast-track certified nursing assistant (CNA) training classes.

Feel free to visit the school’s website at http://www.LegacyHealthcareCareers.com for additional information and resources on careers in the nursing profession. After all, many LPNs and LVNs had originally entered the nursing profession by working as CNAs before ascending the nursing career ladder.

A career as a CNA can potentially serve as a wondrous springboard into the nursing profession. Jump-start your legacy today to make a wise investment in your professional and economic future.