CNAs Regularly Get Promoted in the Long Term Care Setting

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The title of this piece says it all: certified nursing assistants, better known as CNAs, are often promoted to specialized, supervisory or lower management positions in the long term care setting. The varied positions that CNAs are promoted to generally come with alluring perks such as increases in pay, daytime work hours, some authority, chances for career mobility, and more desirable job duties and responsibilities.

So, what types of promotions can CNAs in the long term nursing facility setting receive? CNAs who start their careers in the long term care setting can be promoted into the roles of staffing coordinator, restorative nursing assistant, medical records clerk, shower aide, and central supply manager. These roles all entail some degree of autonomy and require the CNA to be a motivated self-starter with an eagerness to learn new things.

CNAs Can Be Staffing Coordinators

Staffing coordinators are utilized by both hospitals and nursing homes to be responsible for the smooth coordination of schedules and staffing by making sure all shifts at a healthcare facility are covered with adequate numbers of staff members. They closely work alongside nurse managers and supervisors to predict staffing needs and ensure the projected numbers of staff members will be available to cover shifts.

CNAs Can Be Restorative Nursing Assistants

A restorative nursing assistant, often called a restorative nurse aide, is a multi-skilled allied healthcare worker who is trained in the provision of restorative care tasks to patients under the supervision of a licensed nurse. A restorative nursing assistant delivers interventions and implements multiple therapies to patients as delegated to them by the nurse who oversees the nursing facility’s restorative nursing program.

CNAs Can Be Medical Records Clerks

A medical records clerk, sometimes known as a medical records technician, works to ensure patients and residents have accurate medical records. Duties involve assembly, processing, maintenance and proper storage of medical records in accordance with medical, administrative and and regulatory mandates to render them easily accessible between healthcare providers, insurance companies, and the rest of the facility staff.

CNAs Can Be Central Supply Managers

In the long term care setting, central supply managers are tasked with purchasing and obtaining supplies that are needed for patient care such as gloves, personal protective equipment, scales, mechanical lifts, beds, linens, mattresses and other medical supplies. A central supply manager stays in constant contact with vendors and suppliers, adheres to administrative budgets, rents equipment, and checks pricing prior to placing orders.

CNAs Can Be Shower Aides

A shower aide is responsible for the task of providing showers and/or baths, as well as other routine grooming care, to specifically assigned residents in the nursing facility setting. Shower aides typically help residents with personal hygiene and grooming. In addition, they sometimes assist with other daily care tasks for residents. They ensure residents receive showers and/or baths in accordance with predetermined schedules.

Do you want to be promoted into one of these healthcare roles one day in the near future? Become a CNA by enrolling in one of Legacy Healthcare Careers’ two-week nurse aide (CNA) training programs. If you are in the DFW area of Texas, call (682)626-5266 to get started.

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Healthcare Career Spotlight: the Restorative Nursing Assistant

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First of all, a restorative nursing program is an organized series of measures that promote the nursing home resident’s restoration of maximum potential and fosters the ability to live as safely as possible while maintaining independence through specific nursing interventions.  Restorative nursing programs revolve around the attainment and maintenance of maximal physical and psychosocial functioning.

A restorative nursing program aims to to maximize the independence of nursing facility residents by way of preservation of functional abilities, enhancement of self confidence, improvement in function, promotion of safety and the reduction of physical debility.  All goals, objectives and nursing interventions that are incorporated into any restorative nursing program need to be measurable and achievable.

A restorative nursing assistant, also known as a restorative nurse’s aide, is a multi-skilled allied healthcare worker who is trained in rehabilitative techniques and modalities that promote the capability of nursing facility residents to live as independently as possible while emphasizing the highest level of functional ability. Restorative nursing assistants adhere to the nursing home resident’s specific care plan to deliver restorative care.

The main function of the restorative nursing assistant is the provision of rehabilitative and restorative nursing care tasks to patients under the supervision of a licensed nurse. A restorative nursing assistant renders restorative interventions and a wide variety of therapy tasks to patients as delegated to them by the nurse who supervises the restorative nursing program.

Restorative nursing assistants are entrusted with carefully following each patient’s plan of care to assist them in performing active range of motion (AROM) exercises and passive range of motion (PROM) exercises to prevent contracture. The training and knowledge base of most experienced restorative aides enables them to function in their roles competently in a maintenance capacity if the therapist ever happens to be absent.

All restorative nursing services are delivered by restorative nursing assistants in strict accordance with the patient’s uniquely tailored plan of care. In addition to range of motion exercises, restorative nursing assistants also perform bowel and bladder training to aid in restoring urinary and bowel continence, help residents with ambulation (walking), and assist with self-help skills training.

Since restorative nursing programs also promote optimization of mental well-being, restorative nursing assistants might be delegated the tasks of reality orientation, remotivation and reminiscence therapy. Reality orientation therapy gets confused elderly residents to focus on immediate surroundings, whereas reminiscent therapy helps elders by stimulating past thoughts and memories.

Most restorative nursing assistants can be found working in places of employment such as long term care nursing facilities, acute care hospitals, outpatient rehabilitative clinics and specialty rehabilitation hospitals. Restorative nursing assistants work side by side with nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, physical therapy aides, occupational therapy assistants and speech language pathologists.

In general, the ideal restorative nursing assistant needs to have a warm personality and plenty of patience to deal with the elderly nursing facility residents to whom they provide care. Also, a restorative nursing assistant should be well versed in proper body mechanics and possess some physical strength as a result of the bending, heavy lifting, occasional twisting, and long periods of standing they do in a usual shift at work.

Safety is of the essence in the role of a restorative nursing assistant. They must manage and handle patients cautiously to prevent injuries to themselves or the residents under their care. In addition, restorative nursing assistants need to adhere to standard precautions and other basic infection control principles. Furthermore, restorative aides must document the care they provide and any interventions they carry out.

The role of restorative nursing assisting necessitates continual contact with people. Therefore, restorative nursing assistants must be exceedingly comfortable mingling with a wide variety of individuals such as patients, nursing facility residents, nurses, doctors, physical and occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, family members, nurse managers, coworkers, visitors and many others.

To become a restorative nursing assistant, an individual must complete a state-approved nurse aide training program and pass a state examination to obtain professional certification as a certified nursing assistant (CNA). After attaining CNA certification, an individual should amass at least six months of experience in the nursing specialties of acute rehabilitation or long term care.

All restorative nursing assistants are CNAs with specialized training in restorative care. The specialized restorative training can be obtained on the job at a place of employment that is willing to train the right candidate. In addition, CNAs with an interest in becoming restorative aides have the option of completing a formal seminar course to acquire the theoretical knowledge and skills to deliver restorative nursing care to patients.

Demand for restorative aides is projected to remain strong well into the foreseeable near future. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, which places restorative nursing assistants into the Nursing Assistants and Orderlies employment category, the projected job growth rate for this healthcare position is an estimated 11 percent through the year 2026. This projected growth rate exceeds the average for all other jobs.

The vast majority of growth in restorative nursing assistant job openings is the direct result of tens of millions of members of the Baby Boomer generation who are becoming elderly. Aging members of the Baby Boomer cohort have been entering the healthcare system at a steady rate and need restorative nursing care to maintain their levels of functional status. In essence, restorative nursing assistants are very much in demand.

Individuals in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex area of Texas should feel free to call Legacy Healthcare Careers at (682)626-5266 to jump-start an amazing career in the healthcare field. Legacy Healthcare Careers provides high quality, personable, affordable healthcare job training in addition to an array of job placement assistance services. Call Legacy Healthcare Careers today...