2-Week Day and Evening Nurse Aide (CNA) Training Classes Start Monday 4/8/2019

Screenshot 2019-03-15 at 8.47.54 PM

The next daytime and evening certified nursing assistant (CNA) training programs at Legacy Healthcare Careers are scheduled to begin on Monday April 8, 2019. Both of these are fast track two-week nurse aide training classes that prepare students to sit for both the written and skills sections of the Texas CNA state examination. Call the school at (682)626-5266 or (682)313-6404 for additional information.

Legacy Healthcare Careers is a small healthcare occupations vocational school that delivers extremely affordable nurse aide training classes in the middle of the Dallas /Fort Worth metropolitan area. All of the CNA training programs at Legacy Healthcare Careers have full programmatic approvals to operate by both the state Department on Aging and Disability Services (DADS) and the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC).

Tuition and registration fees for the certified nursing assistant training programs are $850; in addition, the school has flexible payment plans. The coursework is only two weeks from start to finish. Also, the planned graduation date for the upcoming April 8th CNA training class will be April 22, 2019. In other words, a motivated individual could potentially enjoy a new career in the exciting healthcare field in just a couple of weeks.

Legacy Healthcare Careers is also offering a fast track one-week (7-day) CNA training program that entails four very long days in the class and three really long clinical shifts. Additionally, a high school diploma or general education diploma (GED) is not required to enroll in nurse aide training program coursework as long as the prospective student can provide timely evidence of an eighth (8th) grade educational attainment.

Also, Legacy Healthcare Careers provides all enrolled nurse aide training students with a comprehensive clinical practicum externship that allows them to deliver hands-on basic nursing care and perform procedural skills on real patients and residents at a skilled healthcare center. Let us not forget that the one week and two week nursing assistant training programs can quickly open the doors to a dynamic career as a nurse aide.

Real job placement assistance is offered to all graduates of the healthcare occupational training programs offered at Legacy Healthcare Careers. A sizable network of hiring managers and healthcare workplaces with job openings is waiting to recruit the in-demand nurse aide graduates and hire them as soon as reasonably possible.

Again, feel free to place a telephone call to Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School at (682)626-5266 for more information. Prospective students can also call the 24-hour enrollment hotline at (682)313-6404 for more information and/or questions regarding upcoming class schedules, clinical externship sites, and any other inquiries about CNA school that need to be clarified. Classes will be starting soon, so reserve a seat now.

Advertisements

Scholastic Spotlight: the Importance of Classmates

Screenshot 2019-03-24 at 2.57.36 PM

Classmates, also referred to as schoolmates, are defined as students who attend at least one of the same classes together at a particular school or educational institution. Classmates are important and can serve as amazingly valuable resources to a person’s future career pathway in the healthcare industry, albeit for a number of good reasons that might not be completely apparent at the first glance.

Why are classmates so valuable? Firstly, classmates can enlarge a person’s professional and personal network. Second, classmates are a great source of knowledge and wisdom. Third, classmates can make the time at school pleasurable. Fourth, classmates can be the ones to provide character references for jobs or college applications. Finally, classmates can help each other to learn the mountains of material being taught in school.

The majority of adult learners opt to go back to school or enroll in career training classes so they can acquire job skills that will make themselves more marketable and salable in the employment marketplace. In other words, people go back to school to increase the odds of getting better jobs for higher pay. Classmates can be a helpful part of a personal network since they may know of potential workplaces that have job openings.

Furthermore, classmates can bestow a lot of free knowledge and pearls of wisdom upon each other by way of sharing their life’s experiences, backgrounds, personal stories and work histories. For instance, the 48-year-old student with 25 years of home health care-giving experience can provide useful info to her classmates on the benefits and pitfalls of giving direct care to clients in a homelike residential workplace setting.

Also, friendly relationships with classmates can enhance the social experience at school. Aristotle said that human beings are social animals and therefore naturally seek the company of others as part of their well being (Cohen, 2010). Students often take pleasure in joining one another for coffee breaks, lunch time and class sessions. These friendly bonds may extend outside school and can last for many years after graduation day.

Do not forget about professional and personal references that a job seeker needs when applying to places of employment, educational programs and so on. Hiring managers and school program directors often request character references from people who can vouch for the applicant’s habits and goodness. When a former student keeps in touch with his classmates, they will be more likely to offer character references for him.

Finally, classmates can help each other learn the material that is being covered in school. Groups of students who attend the same class may form study groups to learn and retain the information. Also, classmates can share the techniques they use to study for quizzes, exams, hands-on skills and reading assignments. Some classmates exchange phone numbers and may call or text each other when they need help or clarification.

Classmates function in all sorts of useful ways. They boost the size of a student’s personal network and can help in the job hunt. They are full of free knowledge and pearls of wisdom, and can enhance the schooling experience. They may serve as much-needed character references and can help each other learn the material. Since classmates are so very useful, they are of the utmost importance during a student’s time in school.

REFERENCES

Cohen, E. (2010, September 21). You Are a Social Animal. Psychology Today. Retrieved March 24, 2019, from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/what-would-aristotle-do/201009/you-are-social-animal

Healthcare Career Spotlight: the Restorative Nursing Assistant

Screenshot 2019-02-12 at 8.23.32 AM

First of all, a restorative nursing program is an organized series of measures that promote the nursing home resident’s restoration of maximum potential and fosters the ability to live as safely as possible while maintaining independence through specific nursing interventions.  Restorative nursing programs revolve around the attainment and maintenance of maximal physical and psychosocial functioning.

A restorative nursing program aims to to maximize the independence of nursing facility residents by way of preservation of functional abilities, enhancement of self confidence, improvement in function, promotion of safety and the reduction of physical debility.  All goals, objectives and nursing interventions that are incorporated into any restorative nursing program need to be measurable and achievable.

A restorative nursing assistant, also known as a restorative nurse’s aide, is a multi-skilled allied healthcare worker who is trained in rehabilitative techniques and modalities that promote the capability of nursing facility residents to live as independently as possible while emphasizing the highest level of functional ability. Restorative nursing assistants adhere to the nursing home resident’s specific care plan to deliver restorative care.

The main function of the restorative nursing assistant is the provision of rehabilitative and restorative nursing care tasks to patients under the supervision of a licensed nurse. A restorative nursing assistant renders restorative interventions and a wide variety of therapy tasks to patients as delegated to them by the nurse who supervises the restorative nursing program.

Restorative nursing assistants are entrusted with carefully following each patient’s plan of care to assist them in performing active range of motion (AROM) exercises and passive range of motion (PROM) exercises to prevent contracture. The training and knowledge base of most experienced restorative aides enables them to function in their roles competently in a maintenance capacity if the therapist ever happens to be absent.

All restorative nursing services are delivered by restorative nursing assistants in strict accordance with the patient’s uniquely tailored plan of care. In addition to range of motion exercises, restorative nursing assistants also perform bowel and bladder training to aid in restoring urinary and bowel continence, help residents with ambulation (walking), and assist with self-help skills training.

Since restorative nursing programs also promote optimization of mental well-being, restorative nursing assistants might be delegated the tasks of reality orientation, remotivation and reminiscence therapy. Reality orientation therapy gets confused elderly residents to focus on immediate surroundings, whereas reminiscent therapy helps elders by stimulating past thoughts and memories.

Most restorative nursing assistants can be found working in places of employment such as long term care nursing facilities, acute care hospitals, outpatient rehabilitative clinics and specialty rehabilitation hospitals. Restorative nursing assistants work side by side with nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, physical therapy aides, occupational therapy assistants and speech language pathologists.

In general, the ideal restorative nursing assistant needs to have a warm personality and plenty of patience to deal with the elderly nursing facility residents to whom they provide care. Also, a restorative nursing assistant should be well versed in proper body mechanics and possess some physical strength as a result of the bending, heavy lifting, occasional twisting, and long periods of standing they do in a usual shift at work.

Safety is of the essence in the role of a restorative nursing assistant. They must manage and handle patients cautiously to prevent injuries to themselves or the residents under their care. In addition, restorative nursing assistants need to adhere to standard precautions and other basic infection control principles. Furthermore, restorative aides must document the care they provide and any interventions they carry out.

The role of restorative nursing assisting necessitates continual contact with people. Therefore, restorative nursing assistants must be exceedingly comfortable mingling with a wide variety of individuals such as patients, nursing facility residents, nurses, doctors, physical and occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, family members, nurse managers, coworkers, visitors and many others.

To become a restorative nursing assistant, an individual must complete a state-approved nurse aide training program and pass a state examination to obtain professional certification as a certified nursing assistant (CNA). After attaining CNA certification, an individual should amass at least six months of experience in the nursing specialties of acute rehabilitation or long term care.

All restorative nursing assistants are CNAs with specialized training in restorative care. The specialized restorative training can be obtained on the job at a place of employment that is willing to train the right candidate. In addition, CNAs with an interest in becoming restorative aides have the option of completing a formal seminar course to acquire the theoretical knowledge and skills to deliver restorative nursing care to patients.

Demand for restorative aides is projected to remain strong well into the foreseeable near future. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, which places restorative nursing assistants into the Nursing Assistants and Orderlies employment category, the projected job growth rate for this healthcare position is an estimated 11 percent through the year 2026. This projected growth rate exceeds the average for all other jobs.

The vast majority of growth in restorative nursing assistant job openings is the direct result of tens of millions of members of the Baby Boomer generation who are becoming elderly. Aging members of the Baby Boomer cohort have been entering the healthcare system at a steady rate and need restorative nursing care to maintain their levels of functional status. In essence, restorative nursing assistants are very much in demand.

Individuals in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex area of Texas should feel free to call Legacy Healthcare Careers at (682)626-5266 to jump-start an amazing career in the healthcare field. Legacy Healthcare Careers provides high quality, personable, affordable healthcare job training in addition to an array of job placement assistance services. Call Legacy Healthcare Careers today...

Top Questions You Must Ask Of Any Nursing Assistant Training Program

books classroom close up college
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

To communicate this message in the most straightforward manner possible, not all certified nursing assistant (CNA) training programs are created equally. First of all, some CNA programs are offered at community colleges whereas other classes are taught at private schools or nonprofit organizations. Second of all, differing schools can charge drastically different tuition and fees for what is essentially the same CNA training.

Thirdly, some schools offer ongoing support services after students graduate from the nursing assistant training program while other schools offer absolutely nothing whatsoever. Ongoing support for nursing assistant graduates that some schools offer can be in the form of job placement assistance, CNA state test preparation courses post-graduation, provision of recommendation letters to other schools and employers, and help with writing résumés and cover letters.

Without further ado, the following is a compilation of questions that prospective students may wish to ask of any nursing assistant training programs they are considering attending.

  1. Is the CNA program approved? Nurse aide training programs must be approved to operate in the state where the school is located. If the nurse aide training program is not approved, graduates will typically not qualify to sit for the CNA state test.
  2. How long does the CNA program take to complete? Some programs take a week or two to complete, whereas other programs drag it out over the duration of an 16-week entire semester.
  3.  Does this program offer job placement assistance? Some nurse aide training programs offer job placement assistance to graduates, which is an immensely helpful service.
  4. Is the CNA program taught by nurses? Most states require nurse aide training programs to be taught by licensed nurses. Some CNA programs employ registered nurses (RNs) to teach all classes, whereas other programs utilize licensed practical/ vocational nurses (LPNs/ LVNs) to provide all the instruction. RNs tend to have more years of clinical and theoretical education than LPNs/ LVNs.
  5. Does the school offer help with passing the CNA state test? Some programs provide ongoing support to help graduates of the CNA training program pass the CNA state test. This is a fabulously helpful service that comes in handy to graduates who need extra help.
  6. What is the average class size? Some schools offer smaller class sizes of less than 10 pupils per class. Other CNA programs can have up to 20+ students attending nurse aide classes together. In general, smaller class sizes can translate into a higher level of individualized attention and more time for questions.

The nursing assistant training programs at Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School are fully approved to operate by the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) and the state Department of Aging and Disability (DADS). In addition, Legacy Healthcare Careers offers job placement assistance to graduates, preparation for the CNA state test, and small class sizes that promote individualized attention to all students.

Moreover, all classes offered at Legacy Healthcare Careers are taught by RNs with many years of combined clinical experience. The tuition and fees for the CNA classes are affordable; additionally, the school offers a highly innovative 7-day course of study that enables students to become nursing assistants in only one week. Call (682)626-5266 to enroll or visit the school’s website at www.LegacyHealthcareCareers.com for more information.

Screenshot 2018-12-14 at 9.59.52 AM

Texas CNA Skills (Part Six): the Art of Nurse Aide Communication on the CNA State Test

person getting his blood check
Photo by Pranidchakan Boonrom on Pexels.com

Communication can be defined as the ongoing exchange of data, information, thoughts, opinions and feelings among persons by way of utilizing speech, gestures and/or other means (Kourkouta and Papathanasaiou, 2014). Since nursing assistants are on the front lines of direct care in healthcare facilities, the communication skills of CNAs are truly fundamental to smooth interpersonal interactions and enhanced patient satisfaction.

Communication between nursing assistants and their patients is firmly grounded in a trifecta of three essential elements. These three elements include competent social skills, proven communicative techniques, and the Golden Rule of always treating other individuals in the same manner that one would want to be treated.

The communication of each nursing assistant is also guided by several ethical principles. First of all, veracity is defined as truth-telling. Nursing assistants possess the ethical obligation to be truthful (read: veracious) in all communications with their patients. Secondly, the ethical principle of integrity imposes a duty upon all nursing assistants to behave in a straightforward manner while adhering to high standards in all communications and encounters with patients. Finally, the ethical principle of fidelity is defined as being faithful, and nursing assistants have the ethical obligation to exercise faithfulness when communicating with patients.

Communication is also an element that is heavily tied into the skills portion of the CNA state test. The test taker will need to communicate with a patient in a simulated patient care scenario as a testing site evaluator observes. The vast majority of the hands-on procedural skills involve some type of verbal and nonverbal communication in order to pass the CNA state test. For instance, most of the skills on the CNA state test call upon the nurse aide test taker to engage in multiple communicative tasks.

The communicative tasks that are incorporated into the skills portion of the CNA state test often include verbal and nonverbal responsibilities such as introducing oneself as the nursing assistant, vocally identifying the patient, referring to the patient by his or her preferred name, explaining the procedure, maintaining face to face contact whenever possible, and asking if anything else is needed.

The following list is a set of general guidelines on communicating clearly and effectively with patients during the skills competency evaluation section of the CNA state test.

  1. The nursing assistant should greet the patient by his or her preferred name.
  2. The nursing assistant should introduce himself or herself to the patient by announcing one’s name and title (e.g., “My name is Rob and I will be your nursing assistant today.”).
  3. The nursing assistant should maintain face to face contact with the patient whenever possible.
  4. The nursing assistant should avoid staring into space or talking aimlessly. The nursing assistant should focus on the topic to be discussed.
  5. The nursing assistant should occasionally talk to the patient while providing the care.
  6. The nursing assistant should listen to the patient as he or she speaks and respond as needed.
  7. The nursing assistant should utilize appropriate social reinforcements such as praise, smiling, and rephrasing of the patient’s words as needed.
  8. The nursing assistant should encourage the patient to utilize the call light as needed and make sure it remains within easy reach.
  9. The nursing assistant should be cordial, even-tempered and honest in all verbal and nonverbal interactions with the patient.
  10. The nursing assistant should let the patient know verbally when he or she is preparing to exit the room.

REFERENCES

Kourkouta, L., and Papathanasaiou, I. (2014). Communication in Nursing Practice. Materia Sociomedica, 26(1), 65-67.

Nursing Career Ladder in the United States (Part Two): the Licensed Practical Nurse, a.k.a. Licensed Vocational Nurse (LPN / LVN)

Screenshot 2018-11-15 at 11.04.47 AM

This post shall be the second in a four-part series that aims to shed some much-needed light on the illustrious nursing career ladder in the United States. Although the certified nursing assistant (CNA) remains the robust foundation of the nursing career ladder in the United States, the licensed practical nurse deserves a markedly special place on a rung of the very same ladder.

A licensed practical nurse, better known as an LPN, is a trained nurse who delivers basic nursing care duties under the direct and indirect supervision of registered nurses and/or physicians. Basic trained nurses in the US states of California and Texas are known as licensed vocational nurses, or LVNs. In fact, LPNs and LVNs are exactly the same type of nurse, but geographical location and local custom has dictated that their titles differ.

Throughout many instances in the lengthy history of the US healthcare system, LPNs have been respectably referred to as the eyes and ears for RNs and physicians. In the settings where they customarily work, LPNs have the tendency to spend more hands-on time delivering direct care and face to face contact to their patients than both RNs and doctors.

LPNs deliver direct nursing care duties that normally include important tasks such as medication administration, observation, data collection, vital sign acquirement, wound care, charting and documentation, dressing changes, supervision of nurses aides, maintenance of ostomies and feeding tube sites, prompt reporting of significant changes in patient status, measurement of inputs and outputs, and urinary catheter care.

To become an LPN / LVN, a prospective candidate must successfully complete a state approved practical nursing program. Completion of a state-approved practical nursing program generally takes about 12 to 18 months from start to finish. In the states of California and Texas, these programs are referred to as vocational nursing programs.

Practical and vocational nursing programs can be found in a diversely interesting variety of educational institutions such as community colleges, trade schools, private academies, and technical colleges. Practical and vocational nursing programs are also offered at many adult education centers, regional occupational programs (ROP), career training schools, and state universities.

Admissions requirements tend to vary depending on the type of institution and the competitiveness of the specific program. Generally speaking, practical nursing programs with the most affordable tuition attract more applicants, so admissions at the schools with the cheaper LPN programs are usually more competitive.

Also, practical nursing programs with excellent reputations in the local community often have competitive admissions processes because since students want to be associated with reputable schools. On the other hand, LPN/LVN programs that are owned and operated by for-profit corporations will usually have far less competitive admissions requirements due to factors such as high-priced tuition and issues with reputability.

The practical / vocational nursing graduate will also need to successfully pass a national licensing exam in order to secure a state license as an LPN / LVN. The name of this national licensing exam is the NCLEX-PN, and it is offered in all 50 U.S. states. Moreover, LPNs /LVNs can utilize a process called endorsement to obtain nursing licensure in additional states.

LPNs / LVNs can be found employed at nursing homes, hospitals, clinics, physicians offices, hospices, home health companies, private duty cases, blood banks, psychiatric facilities, camp sites, and physical rehabilitation centers. LPNs also work at schools, employee health centers, jail intake centers, prison infirmaries, the military, and same-day surgery suites.

Be on the lookout for the third post in this informative four-part series on the United States nursing career ladder. Also, place a telephone call to the Legacy Healthcare Careers campus at (682)626-5266 or call the 24-hour hotline at (682)313-6404 to enroll in affordable fast-track certified nursing assistant (CNA) training classes.

Feel free to visit the school’s website at http://www.LegacyHealthcareCareers.com for additional information and resources on careers in the nursing profession. After all, many LPNs and LVNs had originally entered the nursing profession by working as CNAs before ascending the nursing career ladder.

A career as a CNA can potentially serve as a wondrous springboard into the nursing profession. Jump-start your legacy today to make a wise investment in your professional and economic future.