Partial Tuition Scholarship Money to Help Pay For CNA Classes

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The following news is specifically directed toward any prospective students in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex area of Texas who would like to receive some monetary assistance by way of a partial tuition scholarship to cover the costs of attending CNA (certified nursing assistant) classes. The Health Occupations Scholarship Award helps prospective pupils to attend a CNA training program by partially covering some of the expenses.

For certain students, the Health Occupations Scholarship Award could provide helpful financial assistance that they should surely look up further. Offered by Legacy Healthcare Careers Nursing Assistant School in the Mid Cities region of DFW, this particular scholarship award can be granted to people who are planning to attend a healthcare training program at this Dallas/Fort Worth area institution.

To be eligible, all candidates need to be 18 years of age or older. Ideally, all candidates should have a desire to either join the medical field or healthcare industry, or at least have plans to further their careers in a healthcare vocation. All winners of the Health Occupations Scholarship Award will receive one partial tuition scholarship that also covers the costs of needed books, fees and other pertinent scholastic supplies.

The Health Occupations Scholarship Award has been specifically designated for students who have intentions to enroll in nursing assistant training courses or another type of healthcare occupational training program at Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School. Scholarship applicants are allowed to enroll in healthcare training coursework at Legacy Healthcare Careers on either a full time or part time status.

Students who are potentially eligible for the scholarship award must also exhibit or express their dedication to the medical field and/or healthcare industry by submitting a short essay as part of their application package. Students must have a strong work ethic, prove a verifiable work history, and sign an enrollment agreement in person to attend healthcare training classes at Legacy Healthcare Careers.

Completion of an application for the Health Occupations Scholarship Award is a somewhat simple process to follow. To apply for the scholarship award, visit the Legacy Healthcare Careers official school website (www.LegacyHealthcareCareers.com) and continue to scroll down several pages in order find the correct icon to click to submit a scholarship application.

Potential students are also able to gain immediate access to the application form for the scholarship application if they click on the following link that appears below. Students can also feel free to simply copy and paste the following link into any web browser of their choice to retrieve and access the scholarship application form:

http://www.123formbuilder.com/form-4595340/scholarship-application

The Health Occupations Scholarship awards are issued in the amounts of $250, $100 and $50. Moreover, three (3) scholarship awards are to be issued to winning students on a monthly basis. The scholarship application requires candidates to prepare a short essay of approximately three to seven sentences that provides one or more good reasons for wanting to join the ranks of the healthcare industry or medical field.

It is mandatory that prospective pupils who submit an application package for a scholarship award follow up with a face to face meeting with the Legacy Healthcare Careers director of education or program administrator for a school tour. Only students and prospective students who sign enrollment agreements with Legacy Healthcare Careers will receive one of the partial tuition scholarship awards.

Each scholarship award winner will be chosen on the overall strength of the application package including several factors. These factors include quality, perceived authenticity of the prospective pupil’s essay submission, and the required follow-up visit with a school official at Legacy Healthcare Careers. Scholarship winners will be made aware of their award via telephone calls or face to face during a tour with the director of education.

It must be repeated that the Health Occupations Scholarship Award is only being made available to individuals who sign an enrollment agreement to go to nurse aide training classes or one of the health occupational training programs offered at Legacy Healthcare Careers. Place a call to the school’s 24-hour enrollment hotline number at (682)313-6404 if there are any other questions, concerns, comments or info that need to be addressed.

Do you have the desire to change your life? Wouldn’t you prefer a career instead of just a job? Have you been thinking about acquiring a fulfilling career in the healthcare field? Do you really have what it takes to follow through and make the changes in your life to obtain the new career that you want?

Well, a position as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) is a wondrous way to get one’s foot into the exciting doors of the medical field. Legacy Healthcare Careers is a local school in the Dallas-Fort Worth area of Texas that offers several quick, quality CNA programs. Call us at (682)626-5266 or place a call to our 24-hour hotline at (682)313-6404 if more information is needed.

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Healthcare Career Spotlight: the CNA Trade School Consultant

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First of all, consultants can be found in all industries, specialties and sectors because of the versatile nature of their professional roles. For instance, hospitals and life insurance corporations often procure the services of business consultants or consulting firms for fresh ideas. Likewise, a health foods wholesale supply company or vitamin shop might utilize the breadth of knowledge that a natural health consultant brings to the table.

Thus, a CNA trade school consultant is a multi-faceted professional who has a vast fund of knowledge and expertise in regards to the initial establishment, ongoing management and operational processes that come with the territory of opening and running CNA schools. A CNA (certified nursing assistant) trade school is a vocational school that offers nurse aide training programs to people who want to become CNAs.

CNA trade school consultants are usually well versed on the bureaucratic issues of securing approvals from various municipal and state entities in order to legally operate nurse aide training programs. They have intimate familiarity with all the paperwork, forms, procedures, timelines, and tasks that must be completed before the state approval agencies will grant final approval for the trade school to begin accepting students.

They may also be very familiar with other procedures related to CNA schools, such as the operations of other types of training programs offered at vocational schools. CNA trade school consultants are often able to provide consultative advice to school owners who want to start or add healthcare training programs in medical assisting, massage therapy, phlebotomy, surgical technology, radiography, nursing education and so much more.

CNA trade school consultants assess the specific needs of their clients and discuss the tasks that must be completed to facilitate the state approvals required in order to open their healthcare programs to the public. Some of these tasks include formulation of appropriate curriculum, completion of fire inspections at the school, preparation of school catalogs, acquisition of proper forms and customization of student handbooks.

Consultants may educate clients on the unique aspects of nurse aide training programs, such as admissions requirements, refund policies, entrance exams, clinical site contracts, student background checks, liability issues and business insurance needs. CNA school consultants may also refer clients to accountants, instructors, attorneys, suppliers, publishing companies, accreditation organizations and other professionals as needed.

Some trade school consultants offer their services on a piecemeal basis whereas other consultants will provide bids on comprehensive service packages that include everything that needs to be done in order to establish the vocational school. In addition, some consultants offer added services such as counseling on business plans, educational seminars and webinars, and marketing tips to increase student enrollments.

School owners often seek the specialized services of CNA trade school consultants due to the confusion that frequently arises after finding out about the numerous steps one must take to open a vocational school and/or add new healthcare training programs. Some consultants offer detailed guidance to walk school owners through the bureaucratic complexities while other consultants manage entire projects from start to finish.

Training for CNA trade school consultants varies depending on their specific areas of interest and unique experiential backgrounds. At the time of this writing (2019), state and/or federal licensure requirements for trade school consultants have not been officially enacted into law. Nonetheless, earning relevant college degrees and/or certifications can add an aura of legitimacy to one’s consulting career.

Most CNA school consultants have direct experience in the trade school industry as owners, instructors or managers. Experience can be one of the best forms of schooling for consultants in the trade school industry. After all, they are able to see the process unfold before completing them. After completing the process multiple times, they are able to educate clients on the pertinent processes of starting a school from scratch.

Even though no official college degree requirements currently exist for CNA trade school consultants, ideally they should possess an extensive knowledge base in the realm of starting healthcare training programs. In addition to experience, a consultant in the trade school industry should be able to produce references upon request and exhibit a proven record of previous projects that had been successful.

Do you need the specialized services of a trade school consultant that specializes in starting and adding healthcare training programs? Are you having the most difficult time trying to locate a CNA school consultant to help you out?

Relax and call Legacy CNA School Consultants at (682)313-6404 or visit our website at www.CNASchoolConsultant.com for more information. Perhaps we can help turn your vision of a CNA trade school or healthcare training vocational school into a reality.

 

Healthcare Career Spotlight: the Restorative Nursing Assistant

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First of all, a restorative nursing program is an organized series of measures that promote the nursing home resident’s restoration of maximum potential and fosters the ability to live as safely as possible while maintaining independence through specific nursing interventions.  Restorative nursing programs revolve around the attainment and maintenance of maximal physical and psychosocial functioning.

A restorative nursing program aims to to maximize the independence of nursing facility residents by way of preservation of functional abilities, enhancement of self confidence, improvement in function, promotion of safety and the reduction of physical debility.  All goals, objectives and nursing interventions that are incorporated into any restorative nursing program need to be measurable and achievable.

A restorative nursing assistant, also known as a restorative nurse’s aide, is a multi-skilled allied healthcare worker who is trained in rehabilitative techniques and modalities that promote the capability of nursing facility residents to live as independently as possible while emphasizing the highest level of functional ability. Restorative nursing assistants adhere to the nursing home resident’s specific care plan to deliver restorative care.

The main function of the restorative nursing assistant is the provision of rehabilitative and restorative nursing care tasks to patients under the supervision of a licensed nurse. A restorative nursing assistant renders restorative interventions and a wide variety of therapy tasks to patients as delegated to them by the nurse who supervises the restorative nursing program.

Restorative nursing assistants are entrusted with carefully following each patient’s plan of care to assist them in performing active range of motion (AROM) exercises and passive range of motion (PROM) exercises to prevent contracture. The training and knowledge base of most experienced restorative aides enables them to function in their roles competently in a maintenance capacity if the therapist ever happens to be absent.

All restorative nursing services are delivered by restorative nursing assistants in strict accordance with the patient’s uniquely tailored plan of care. In addition to range of motion exercises, restorative nursing assistants also perform bowel and bladder training to aid in restoring urinary and bowel continence, help residents with ambulation (walking), and assist with self-help skills training.

Since restorative nursing programs also promote optimization of mental well-being, restorative nursing assistants might be delegated the tasks of reality orientation, remotivation and reminiscence therapy. Reality orientation therapy gets confused elderly residents to focus on immediate surroundings, whereas reminiscent therapy helps elders by stimulating past thoughts and memories.

Most restorative nursing assistants can be found working in places of employment such as long term care nursing facilities, acute care hospitals, outpatient rehabilitative clinics and specialty rehabilitation hospitals. Restorative nursing assistants work side by side with nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, physical therapy aides, occupational therapy assistants and speech language pathologists.

In general, the ideal restorative nursing assistant needs to have a warm personality and plenty of patience to deal with the elderly nursing facility residents to whom they provide care. Also, a restorative nursing assistant should be well versed in proper body mechanics and possess some physical strength as a result of the bending, heavy lifting, occasional twisting, and long periods of standing they do in a usual shift at work.

Safety is of the essence in the role of a restorative nursing assistant. They must manage and handle patients cautiously to prevent injuries to themselves or the residents under their care. In addition, restorative nursing assistants need to adhere to standard precautions and other basic infection control principles. Furthermore, restorative aides must document the care they provide and any interventions they carry out.

The role of restorative nursing assisting necessitates continual contact with people. Therefore, restorative nursing assistants must be exceedingly comfortable mingling with a wide variety of individuals such as patients, nursing facility residents, nurses, doctors, physical and occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, family members, nurse managers, coworkers, visitors and many others.

To become a restorative nursing assistant, an individual must complete a state-approved nurse aide training program and pass a state examination to obtain professional certification as a certified nursing assistant (CNA). After attaining CNA certification, an individual should amass at least six months of experience in the nursing specialties of acute rehabilitation or long term care.

All restorative nursing assistants are CNAs with specialized training in restorative care. The specialized restorative training can be obtained on the job at a place of employment that is willing to train the right candidate. In addition, CNAs with an interest in becoming restorative aides have the option of completing a formal seminar course to acquire the theoretical knowledge and skills to deliver restorative nursing care to patients.

Demand for restorative aides is projected to remain strong well into the foreseeable near future. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, which places restorative nursing assistants into the Nursing Assistants and Orderlies employment category, the projected job growth rate for this healthcare position is an estimated 11 percent through the year 2026. This projected growth rate exceeds the average for all other jobs.

The vast majority of growth in restorative nursing assistant job openings is the direct result of tens of millions of members of the Baby Boomer generation who are becoming elderly. Aging members of the Baby Boomer cohort have been entering the healthcare system at a steady rate and need restorative nursing care to maintain their levels of functional status. In essence, restorative nursing assistants are very much in demand.

Individuals in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex area of Texas should feel free to call Legacy Healthcare Careers at (682)626-5266 to jump-start an amazing career in the healthcare field. Legacy Healthcare Careers provides high quality, personable, affordable healthcare job training in addition to an array of job placement assistance services. Call Legacy Healthcare Careers today...

CNA School Open Enrollment Event: February 12, 2019

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The time has come to welcome prospective nurse aide students to Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School’s Open House /Open Enrollment event located at 7100 Boulevard 26, Suite 205, Richland Hills, Texas 76180. Food will be provided on a first come /first serve basis. This event takes place on Tuesday February 12, 2019 between 2:00pm and 5:00pm.

The staff of Legacy Healthcare Careers will be offering helpful information on healthcare careers, immediate assistance with enrollment in nurse aide training classes on the spot, and tours of the school. Please bring a photo ID, social security card, and a $200 down payment to enroll.

The next CNA classes at this Fort Worth area school will be starting on Monday February 18, 2019 as well as Monday February 25, 2019. Legacy Healthcare Careers offers an affordable 7-day (1-week) CNA program. In addition, the school offers a 2-week CNA program and a 3-week CNA program.

Please RSVP via e-mail to Legacy Healthcare Careers at LegacyHealthcareCareers@ Yahoo.com by Tuesday February 12 to indicate whether you can attend, or feel free to telephone the school’s 24-hour enrollment hotline at (682)313-6404 to confirm your attendance at this open house event.

The staff of Legacy Healthcare Careers hopes to see you at this special open enrollment event. The school owes its success to people like you, so please graciously accept our sincere gratitude for your support. A career in the healthcare industry can be fulfilling and transforming. In addition, a healthcare career can boost your value in the local employment value, so jump-start your legacy today.

Healthcare Career Spotlight: the Patient Transporter

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A patient transporter, also referred to in some hospital systems as an orderly, is a multi-skilled allied healthcare worker whose primary workplace responsibility involves the safe transport of patients and clients from one destination to another within hospitals and other types of healthcare facilities. A competent patient transporter uses his or her skills to make things easier for patients and medical staff at healthcare facilities.

Most nurses and other healthcare workers would readily agree about the extreme usefulness of patient transporters. Furthermore, patient transporters are really important assets to the healthcare team at many hospitals because without their assortment of skills, many medical care settings would have extreme difficulty dealing with the most routine operations.

After all, facilities that do not use patient transporters usually force members of nursing staff to complete all transporting. For instance, a nurse who must transport a patient from the cardiac floor of a hospital to the interventional radiology suite must leave his other patients unattended for up to 30 minutes while he accompanies the lone patient. Imagine how inconvenient this would be for that nurse and his other patients!

Generally, the patient transporter needs to have a kind disposition, a lot of patience and an empathetic outlook toward the ill patients and clients that require transporting from one location to another. In addition, good body mechanics and some physical strength would be immensely useful due to the fact that patient transporters must bend, lift heavy loads, twist, and do a great deal of standing during a typical work shift.

The role of patient transporting has grown in recent years, so patient transporters have had to rise to the occasion to keep up with the demands and complexities of the present day health system in the United States.  Patient transporters transfer patients from beds to wheelchairs or stretchers to transport them to various locations, push occupied and unoccupied wheelchairs, and assist people to get into vehicles such as cars and vans.

Safety is essential when working as a patient transporter. They must transfer patients with extreme care and caution to avoid injuring themselves or the people they have been entrusted to transport. Confidentiality is imperative for patient transporters since they verify clients’ identities prior to transport and are privy to protected health information and other private matters. They must also adhere to infection control principles.

Patient transporters may have additional duties such as wheeling or pushing patients to the correct location within hospitals, taking patients to medical appointments, assisting patients onto examination tables, and transporting patients to the curbside or parking lot of the hospital in order to board ambulances and/or non-emergency medical transportation vans. Patient transporters also document their tasks upon completion.

In addition to transporting clients, patient transporters often transport and hand-deliver items such as heavy equipment, specimens and lab/diagnostic results to various locations within the hospital. At some facilities, patient transporters routinely transport bodies of deceased patients to the hospital morgue. Depending on the type of facility, some patient transporters serve as van drivers who drive clients to and from appointments.

Since the role of patient transporting requires constant contact with people, patient transporters should feel comfortable interacting with a wide variety of persons including patients, nurses, physicians, family members, coworkers, managers, visitors, vendors and others. Moreover, patient transporters must have a knack for swiftly gaining the trust and cooperation of the many patients who require transport each day.

Patient transporters can be found working in places of employment such as acute care hospitals, large skilled nursing facilities, assisted living facilities, personal care group homes and non-emergency transportation companies. Individuals who have an interest in entering this healthcare career pathway must usually have a high school diploma or G.E.D. before training for this specific position on the job.

Prior work experience in the allied healthcare field and/or professional certification as an emergency medical technician (EMT) or certified nursing assistant (CNA) can be helpful to prepare for the daily functions of a patient transporter. Also, professional certification can provide a potential advantage that might result in an applicant standing out in a sea of other job seekers who apply for patient transporter positions.

The demand for patient transporters in the job market is projected to remain steady well into the near future. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, which classifies patient transporters under the Orderlies employment category, the projected growth rate for this specific position is 11 percent through the year 2024. This projected growth rate exceeds the average for all other jobs.

Much of this growth in patient transporter job openings can be attributed to the large wave of the Baby Boomer generation that is expected to have a profound impact on healthcare facilities. Aging members of the Baby Boomer cohort are already entering the healthcare system and requiring transport from one location to another. Therefore, patient transporters are very much needed in the employment market.

People who live and/or work in the Dallas/Fort Worth area of Texas should call Legacy Healthcare Careers at (682)626-5266 to jump-start a life-transforming career in the healthcare industry. Legacy Healthcare Careers offers affordable career training as well as job placement assistance. Call today...

How Does the Opioid Epidemic Affect the Healthcare Field in the United States?

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The opioid epidemic, also known as the opioid crisis, first gained serious traction in the United States during the 1990s decade due to a number of momentous factors such as a marked increase in the number of pain killer prescriptions along with the fiercely addictive qualities of these medications. Also, big name pharmaceutical companies started to aggressively market and advertise opioid prescription drugs in the 1990s.

Unfortunately, the opioid epidemic has been having an awful impact on numerous individuals, their families, American society, and the healthcare field as a whole over the course of the previous two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2018), the number of overdose deaths involving prescription opioid drugs has been on a noticeable rise since 1999 with no slowdown in sight.

So, in what ways does the opioid epidemic affect the healthcare field in the U.S.? Well, people from all walks of life are addicted to opioids, so this epidemic has most certainly impacted many of the patients, coworkers and visitors who are participants in the healthcare system. The following list consists of the various ways in which the current opioid crisis has affected the healthcare field.

  • Impaired healthcare workers and providers: Many physicians, nurses, technicians and other allied healthcare workers have battled fierce addictions to opioids. Some healthcare professionals have even had their professional licenses and/or certifications revoked due to impaired practice or an inability to conquer their addictions. Other healthcare workers have entered drug rehab or chemical dependency programs.
  • Treatment of overdose: There has been a sharp increase in the number of addicted patients who are entering the healthcare system by way of rolling into hospital emergency departments on stretchers after having suffered opioid overdoses. In some regions, overburdened emergency medical service providers regularly deal with shortages of Narcan, the injectable medication that reverses the effects of opioid overdose.
  • Drug rehabilitative services: Some people enter the healthcare system by opting to receive inpatient drug rehab or participate in chemical dependency programs to battle their addictions to opioids. The number of health insurance plans that cover some or all of the costs associated with drug rehab or chemical dependency treatment has grown larger. Thus, many addicted persons are fighting their addictions by using these avenues.
  • Treatment of chronic disease processes: Still, some patients end up in the healthcare system for treatment of chronic hepatitis C, HIV and other bloodborne illnesses after contracting these viruses by using unclean hypodermic needles to inject opioid drugs. Many people who inject heroin were once users of prescription opioid pain pills. However, an alarming number of these folks switched to heroin since it is cheaper and delivers the same type of high.
  • Pain management clinics: Physicians who work in the specialty of pain medicine can earn very lucrative incomes due in part to the opioid epidemic. A pain doctor is a medical physician (M.D.) or doctor of osteopathy (D.O.) who specializes in pain medicine. Pain management clinics, referred to as ‘pain clinics’ for short, are doing brisk business as a result of the number of drug-seeking patients who visit them to request prescriptions and refills for opioid medications.
  • Impaired family members and visitors: Nurses, nursing assistants, patient care technicians and other healthcare workers who deliver direct patient care at the bedside must occasionally deal with visitors who are obviously impaired. Almost any experienced healthcare worker can describe the so-called ‘opioid nod’ with stunning accuracy because they have seen so many family members nodding off while visiting with hospitalized patients.
  • Infants born to addicted mothers: Newborns who are exposed to opioids during the prenatal period begin to experience severe withdrawal symptoms within 48 to 72 hours after birth. This heartbreaking phenomenon is referred to as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Moreover, the number of infants being born with neonatal abstinence syndrome has been increasing steadily due to the large number of pregnant women who abuse opioid drugs.
  • Lost productivity: The opioid crisis is putting a burdensome strain on employers and corporations, including many healthcare companies. The steepest monetary costs linked with the opioid epidemic arise mainly due to lost productivity and earnings losses for corporations. Untimely overdose deaths and opioid addiction disorders also affect municipal, county, state and federal governments in a detrimental manner by way of losses in tax revenue.
  • Staggeringly high healthcare costs: Healthcare costs connected with the opioid epidemic have exceeded $200 billion since 2001. These expenses are primarily due to pre-hospital emergency medical services (a.k.a. ambulance care), visits to local emergency departments, and the widespread use of Narcan, a medication that rapidly reverses the effects of opioid overdose. Also, opioid addicts cost their employers approximately twice as much in healthcare expenses when compared to their non-addicted workmates.

CNAs and the Basics of Reciprocity

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So, just what exactly is reciprocity? Those who currently work in the allied healthcare field as CNAs (certified nursing assistants) or have plans to become a CNA will need to become very familiar with the concept of reciprocity. Knowing what reciprocity means is of the essence, especially in this modern day and age where people relocate to different regions more often than in the recent past.

Reciprocity is the multi-step process that permits CNAs who hold out-of-state certification to obtain a new CNA certificate in a receiving state, pending approval from the new state’s CNA registry or board of nursing. In other words, reciprocity agreements let CNAs officially transfer their certification from state to state. This allows CNAs to legally work as nursing assistants in their new home states.

In order to successfully complete the process of reciprocity and receive a CNA certificate from the new state of residence, a CNA will need to fulfill one or more state-specific requirements. The reciprocity process can be complicated at times because each state has different requirements for CNA training, clinical hours, continuing education (CEs), certification renewal, and so forth.

Pre-existing reciprocity agreements allow the different states to sort through variances in CNA certification requirements to more easily facilitate certificate transfers and fill healthcare job openings with qualified, experienced candidates. The vast majority of states in the U.S. have reciprocity policies in place for CNAs and other types of allied healthcare workers to transfer their certificates.

When would a CNA need to be concerned with the process of reciprocity? Well, a CNA who plans to move out of state needs to become familiar with reciprocity if he or she wants to obtain CNA certification in his or her new state of residence. Therefore, a CNA who intends to relocate to another state will need to start making preparations far in advance by looking up the CNA requirements in the new state.

Each state has individual laws and regulations regarding CNA certification. As a consequence, the state in which a nurse aide initially earned his or her CNA certification could quite possibly have some very different requirements for CNA training and continuing education than the state where he or she has plans to relocate.

In addition, the number of training hours required to become a CNA can drastically differ from state to state. As a classic example, the state of Alabama requires nurse aides to obtain 75 hours of occupational training to attain eligibility for certification as a CNA. The training hours are partitioned in the following way: 59 hours of class and return lab demonstration time, and 16 hours of hands-on clinical practicum externship.

Let’s consider the next scenario. A nurse aide who went to school and attained a CNA certification in Alabama ends up moving to the state of California several years down the line. Now an issue may have arisen since California requires more training hours to get a CNA certification than Alabama. California requires 160 hours of occupational training to become a CNA, more than double the 75 hours of training required by Alabama.

CNA training hours in California are partitioned in the following manner: 60 hours of classroom theory schooling along with 100 hours of hands-on clinical practicum externship. In this complicated situation, the CNA from Alabama who wants to move to California would fall short of exactly one hour of classroom theory schooling and a whopping 84 hours of clinical externship training.

In this case, the receiving state of California would utilize their pre-existing reciprocity agreement policies to determine whether or not to grant CNA certification to the nurse aide from Alabama. California’s reciprocity agreement entails policies to accept out-of-state nurse aides and grant them CNA certification if they can prove they have accrued at least two years of recent work experience as a CNA in the previous home state.

Other state boards of nursing might outright refuse to issue a CNA certificate to the nurse aide from Alabama, and consequently ask the person to complete additional nursing assistant training that fulfills the new state’s schooling requirements. Also, some states may opt to grant CNA certification to the nurse aide from Alabama due to his or her number of years of work experience as a nursing assistant.

Still, a few states may make the choice to grant a conditional or provisional CNA certification to the nurse aide from Alabama pending one or more specific requirements that will need to be met. The Alabama nurse aide may be required to complete additional schooling, submit proof of completion of specific continuing education or in-service coursework, or successfully challenge the CNA state test in the new state of residence.

The theme of this posting is the overall importance of empowering oneself with as much knowledge as possible about the reciprocity process for CNAs, especially if an out-of-state move is planned in the near or distant future. After all, knowledge is power. It would be a crying shame to struggle to secure employment in one’s new state of residence due to a lack of awareness regarding the process of CNA reciprocity.

Train to become a certified nursing assistant (CNA) in approximately two weeks at Legacy Healthcare Careers, a CNA School in the Dallas/Fort Worth area of Texas. The staff at Legacy Healthcare Careers can be reached 24 hours a day at (682)626-5266 so prospective students can jump-start a life-transforming career change in the healthcare field.

Legacy Healthcare Careers delivers affordable, quality career training as well as job placement assistance. Pick up the telephone and call (682)626-5266 to enroll.