How Does the Opioid Epidemic Affect the Healthcare Field in the United States?

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The opioid epidemic, also known as the opioid crisis, first gained serious traction in the United States during the 1990s decade due to a number of momentous factors such as a marked increase in the number of pain killer prescriptions along with the fiercely addictive qualities of these medications. Also, big name pharmaceutical companies started to aggressively market and advertise opioid prescription drugs in the 1990s.

Unfortunately, the opioid epidemic has been having an awful impact on numerous individuals, their families, American society, and the healthcare field as a whole over the course of the previous two decades. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2018), the number of overdose deaths involving prescription opioid drugs has been on a noticeable rise since 1999 with no slowdown in sight.

So, in what ways does the opioid epidemic affect the healthcare field in the U.S.? Well, people from all walks of life are addicted to opioids, so this epidemic has most certainly impacted many of the patients, coworkers and visitors who are participants in the healthcare system. The following list consists of the various ways in which the current opioid crisis has affected the healthcare field.

  • Impaired healthcare workers and providers: Many physicians, nurses, technicians and other allied healthcare workers have battled fierce addictions to opioids. Some healthcare professionals have even had their professional licenses and/or certifications revoked due to impaired practice or an inability to conquer their addictions. Other healthcare workers have entered drug rehab or chemical dependency programs.
  • Treatment of overdose: There has been a sharp increase in the number of addicted patients who are entering the healthcare system by way of rolling into hospital emergency departments on stretchers after having suffered opioid overdoses. In some regions, overburdened emergency medical service providers regularly deal with shortages of Narcan, the injectable medication that reverses the effects of opioid overdose.
  • Drug rehabilitative services: Some people enter the healthcare system by opting to receive inpatient drug rehab or participate in chemical dependency programs to battle their addictions to opioids. The number of health insurance plans that cover some or all of the costs associated with drug rehab or chemical dependency treatment has grown larger. Thus, many addicted persons are fighting their addictions by using these avenues.
  • Treatment of chronic disease processes: Still, some patients end up in the healthcare system for treatment of chronic hepatitis C, HIV and other bloodborne illnesses after contracting these viruses by using unclean hypodermic needles to inject opioid drugs. Many people who inject heroin were once users of prescription opioid pain pills. However, an alarming number of these folks switched to heroin since it is cheaper and delivers the same type of high.
  • Pain management clinics: Physicians who work in the specialty of pain medicine can earn very lucrative incomes due in part to the opioid epidemic. A pain doctor is a medical physician (M.D.) or doctor of osteopathy (D.O.) who specializes in pain medicine. Pain management clinics, referred to as ‘pain clinics’ for short, are doing brisk business as a result of the number of drug-seeking patients who visit them to request prescriptions and refills for opioid medications.
  • Impaired family members and visitors: Nurses, nursing assistants, patient care technicians and other healthcare workers who deliver direct patient care at the bedside must occasionally deal with visitors who are obviously impaired. Almost any experienced healthcare worker can describe the so-called ‘opioid nod’ with stunning accuracy because they have seen so many family members nodding off while visiting with hospitalized patients.
  • Infants born to addicted mothers: Newborns who are exposed to opioids during the prenatal period begin to experience severe withdrawal symptoms within 48 to 72 hours after birth. This heartbreaking phenomenon is referred to as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Moreover, the number of infants being born with neonatal abstinence syndrome has been increasing steadily due to the large number of pregnant women who abuse opioid drugs.
  • Lost productivity: The opioid crisis is putting a burdensome strain on employers and corporations, including many healthcare companies. The steepest monetary costs linked with the opioid epidemic arise mainly due to lost productivity and earnings losses for corporations. Untimely overdose deaths and opioid addiction disorders also affect municipal, county, state and federal governments in a detrimental manner by way of losses in tax revenue.
  • Staggeringly high healthcare costs: Healthcare costs connected with the opioid epidemic have exceeded $200 billion since 2001. These expenses are primarily due to pre-hospital emergency medical services (a.k.a. ambulance care), visits to local emergency departments, and the widespread use of Narcan, a medication that rapidly reverses the effects of opioid overdose. Also, opioid addicts cost their employers approximately twice as much in healthcare expenses when compared to their non-addicted workmates.

Healthcare Career Spotlight: the Certified Medication Aide

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Certified medication aides, also known in some states in the U.S. as assistive medication administration personnel or medication technicians, have a clearly defined role in the allied healthcare field that is definitely worth exploring further. The overriding goal of this piece is to discuss the medication aide, including the day to day duties and responsibilities associated with this role.

Medication aides are helpful members of the allied healthcare team who assist licensed nurses in the realm of medication therapy. The primary function of the medication aide is safe administration of non-injectable over-the-counter and prescription drugs to clients, patients and residents. Medication aides work at the bedside to distribute medications to a large number of clients in a timely manner.

Medication aides are utilized extensively in certain settings, but never found in other types of workplaces. Post-acute healthcare settings such as long term care facilities, personal care group homes, correctional facilities, schools and assisted living facilities utilize medication aides regularly depending on the state. Meanwhile, medication aides are not utilized in the acute care hospital setting.

Most, but not all, states in the U.S. allow medication aides to work. In the states that do allow the use of medication aides, they are permitted to administer oral, topical, transdermal, eye and ear medicines to clients under the supervision of a licensed nurse. In addition, medication aides communicate with clients, report changes in patients’ conditions, obtain vital signs, and document their findings.

Because of pre-existing regulations in most states, the vast majority of medication aides have prior patient care work experience as certified nursing assistants (CNAs) or unlicensed assistive direct care workers. To be admitted into most medication aide training programs, students must be 18 years of age or older with a high school diploma or G.E.D. and submit evidence of work experience as a CNA or direct care worker.

The educational requirements to become a medication aide differ in each state. For instance, the requirements to become a medication aide in Texas entail 140 hours of training. The 140-hour medication aide training programs in Texas are comprised of 100 hours of classroom (didactic) teaching, 30 hours of hands-on return skill demonstrations and 10 hours of clinical externship practicum.

The medication aide training classes consist of a targeted review of a number of relevant topics such as medical terminology, human body systems, effects of medication on each body system, infection control, and drug medication classifications. The goal of the medication aide program curriculum is to bestow pertinent knowledge upon students so they will be able to administer medications safely and prudently.

Individuals who graduate from medication aide programs must also pass a written medication aide examination in the state where they plan to secure employment. The medication aide state test usually contains 100 multiple choice questions on medication therapies. Students who pass the written medication aide state test receive a practice permit or state certification as a certified medication aide.

The state medication aide certification and/or practice permit allows the certified individual to work in a wide variety of healthcare settings for fairly competitive pay. In addition, the working conditions of medication aides are generally not as demanding on the body as those experienced by nursing assistants and direct care workers. For many people, a career as a medication aide is a step up.

How does a career in the healthcare industry sound? A career as a medication aide is an awesome entry point into the healthcare field. Working in the allied healthcare field as a medication aide can serve as a wondrously great foundation to any person’s occupational future. 

Legacy Healthcare Careers will soon be offering a medication aide program in the spring of 2019 at our Fort Worth area campus. Place that phone call to (682)626-5266 or the 24-hour hotline at (682)313-6404 to get more information. This is an opportunity that should not be passed up.

Spotlight on an Obscure Healthcare Career: the Dental Nurse

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The special role of the dental nurse remains obscure in many intriguing ways. The overarching goal of this piece is to shed some light on the role and professional responsibilities of dental nurses, as well as the training and registration requirements that they must adhere to.

Dental nurses are uniquely vital team members of the healthcare career ladder who assist in all types of dentistry treatments and work in all sorts of dental specialties. The primary function of the dental nurse is to provide ancillary support to dentists as they deliver care to patients. Dental nurses work collaboratively at the chairside with dentists during the completion of oral surgeries and other procedures and treatments.

Very few licensed dental nurses are employed in the United States; thus, their role remains very shrouded in mystery to most folks who dwell in the US. In fact, many people in the US have never even heard of a dental nurse. In addition, the majority of dentists in the US prefer to use dental assistants and dental hygienists as a way to contain labor costs. After all, a dental assistant is usually less costly to hire than a nurse.

Nonetheless, dental nurses are heavily utilized in a number of other countries, especially the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Malaysia. Dental nurses are also utilized on a much smaller scale in several provinces of Canada, especially Ontario.

A dental nurse works at the chairside next to dentists as they provide ongoing care during patients’ visits. Some of the tasks that dental nurses may do include the following: obtaining health histories, taking and recording vital signs, performing assessments, applying numbing agents to patients’ gums prior to invasive treatments, administering topical fluoride, and providing postoperative education after oral surgical procedures.

Dental nurses might also be responsible for routine duties such as preparing materials, sterilizing equipment with autoclaves, reordering supplies, taking x-rays, obtaining impressions, and making sure the appropriate instruments are available to the dentist during treatments. Also, dental nurses might be responsible for clerical tasks such as answering telephone calls, scheduling appointments, and processing payments.

The minuscule number of dental offices that utilize licensed dental nurses in the US are ones that perform a large number of oral surgeries. These surgical procedures require specialized assessment and observation of sedated patients after administration of local or general anesthesia, so these dental practices may hire and use licensed practical nurses (LPNs) or registered nurses (RNs) with post anesthesia care unit experience.

In other countries, most dental nurses secure employment in a variety of workplaces that include general dentistry clinics, oral & maxillofacial surgery practices or orthodontic offices. Additionally, other dental nurses can be found working for the military, dental hospitals, office management, nonprofit agencies or other public organizations.

In the UK, dental nurses must be registered. Since 2008, it has been mandatory that all dental nurses be registered with the General Dental Council (GDC). In addition, it is unlawful to use the title of ‘dental nurse’ without the appropriate registration. To become a dental nurse in the UK, a prospective student can enroll in a post-secondary program at a dental hospital or school of dental nursing to obtain practical training.

Would you like to climb aboard the nursing career ladder? Well, a career as a nursing assistant is a wonderful foundation to any person’s potential future in the nursing profession. Do you have the motivation to follow through and make a career change? Do you have what it takes to rise to the challenge?

The 7-day CNA program at Legacy Healthcare Careers delivers fast-track, state-approved vocational training to become a nursing assistant in a matter of days. Place a telephone call to (682)626-5266 or the 24-hour enrollment hotline at (682)313-6404 to enroll at Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School today! Classes are starting soon. Do not miss out on this opportunity.

Healthcare Career Spotlight: the Medical Office Assistant

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A medical office assistant, also known as an administrative medical assistant or front office medical assistant, is a multifaceted allied healthcare professional whose primary function is to ensure that the front office area of physicians’ offices, clinics, medical groups and hospital units runs smoothly. A competent medical office assistant puts an array of soft interpersonal skills and hard procedural skills to use every single workday to get the job done.

Medical office assistants are vital members of the healthcare team because without their varied skill set, many healthcare settings would have difficulty managing day to day operations. In general, the medical office assistant tends to be the very first individual with whom patients, clients vendors and visitors come into contact at most physicians’ offices and clinic settings. Thus, these multi-skilled healthcare workers serve as the front line backbones of many workplace settings.

The allied health occupation of front office medical assisting has expanded greatly over the past few decades. Therefore, the role of the typical medical office assistant has also expanded to keep up with modern times.  Medical office assistants complete tasks such as scheduling patients’ appointments, greeting and checking patients and visitors in, coordinating visits with guests such as pharmaceutical representatives, and contacting vendors to reorder supplies.

Medical office assistants may also be responsible for clerical duties such as computer data entry, conducting phone interviews, verifying clients’ personal health information, obtaining signatures on new patient forms, sending faxes, compiling charts, filing paperwork, scanning documents, maintaining the orderly appearance of the reception area, and ensuring that diagnostic results reach the appropriate healthcare providers.

Depending on the policies of the specific workplace, many medical office assistants also carry out tasks that are either directly or indirectly related to monetary collection. Some of these duties may include gathering information on health insurance payer sources, processing payments in exchange for healthcare services, generating receipts, making patients aware of co-payment and/or coinsurance amounts, scanning documents such as insurance cards, and setting up payment plans.

Since the field of medical assisting entails intensive contact with people, medical office assistants need to be extremely comfortable interacting with a variety of individuals including patients, physicians, coworkers, visitors, families, vendors and others. The role of a medical office assistant necessitates effective communication skills. In addition, medical office assistants must have the ability to quickly establish trust and cooperation with the multitude of people who visit the healthcare setting on a daily basis.

Medical office assistants are employed primarily in workplaces such as clinics, multi-specialty medical group practices, acute care hospital wards, physicians’ offices, and ambulatory surgical centers. After amassing several years of experience, some medical assistants secure employment as medical office assistant instructors at trade schools, community colleges, technical colleges, and private for-profit academies.

Persons with an interest in entering this career pathway must usually have a high school diploma or G.E.D. before completing a training program in medical assisting that results in a postsecondary certificate, diploma or associate of applied science degree. Medical office assistant diploma and certificate programs are typically less than one year long. On the other hand, programs that lead to an associate of applied science degree generally take two years to complete from start to finish.

Medical office assistant career training programs are offered at several different types of postsecondary schools such as technical colleges, community colleges, trade schools, state universities, vocational schools, adult education centers, regional occupational programs and private for-profit academies.

Most employers prefer to hire medical office assistants who possess a professional certification. As a result, a number of entities will certify the medical assistant’s vast fund of knowledge. The National Healthcareer Association, the National Center for Competency Testing and the American Medical Certification Association are three different entities that offer professional certification to medical office assistants.

Furthermore, medical office assistants remain in high demand in many employment markets for the near future. Employment of medical assistants is projected to increase by approximately 29 percent through the year 2026, which happens to be much faster than the average for all occupations. Much of this job growth is driven by grand openings and expansions of doctors’ offices, hospitals, clinics and multi-specialty group practices.

 

Healthcare Career Spotlight: the Phlebotomy Technician, a.k.a. Phlebotomist

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A phlebotomy technician, also referred to as a phlebotomist at times, is an allied healthcare specialist whose primary responsibilities include blood withdrawal, specimen collection and finger sticks. Phlebotomy technicians have received occupational training to ensure they have the knowledge and psychomotor skills to draw blood and obtain specimens from patients with a certain degree of accuracy.

Phlebotomy technicians are immensely important members of the healthcare team because without their hands-on procedural skills, many physicians and other types of healthcare providers would not be able to accurately diagnose and treat their patients in a timely manner. The main duty of the phlebotomy technician is to obtain patients’ blood specimens by way of venipuncture and micro techniques.

In the healthcare field, venipuncture is a term that refers to the puncture of a vein, usually to withdraw a sample of blood for testing purposes. Phlebotomy technicians perform venipuncture on a routine basis to draw blood from patients. Phlebotomy technicians also obtain blood specimens by way of micro techniques such as sticking patients’ fingers with lancet devices and using pipettes.

Since phlebotomy involves extensive contact with people, phlebotomy technicians must be comfortable interacting with patients, coworkers, vendors and other individuals. The role of a phlebotomy technician requires effective communication skills as well as the ability to establish rapport and trust with patients. Phlebotomy technicians regularly interview patients prior to drawing their blood. They might also answer phone calls.

The healthcare specialty of phlebotomy has grown by leaps and bounds over the past few decades. Thus, the role of the phlebotomy technician has also grown to include an array of tasks that are clerical in nature such as light data entry, verification of patients’ personal health information, creating labels, filling in information on handwritten requisition forms, obtaining signatures, sending faxes, scanning documents and reordering supplies.

Depending on the place of employment, some phlebotomy technicians must also perform duties that involve financial matters. Some of these duties may include gathering info on health insurance payer sources, collecting payments in exchange for rendered services, printing receipts, notifying patients of their exact co-payment and/or coinsurance amounts, and making copies of documents such as insurance cards.

Phlebotomy technicians are employed mostly in workplaces such as acute care hospitals, medical and diagnostic laboratories, blood bank donor collection centers, clinics, and physicians’ offices. After accruing several years of experience, some phlebotomists secure employment as phlebotomy instructors at vocational schools, community colleges and private for-profit academies. Most employers seek phlebotomists who have attained professional certification.

Patient safety is of the essence, so phlebotomy technicians must strictly adhere to all safety precautions in order to prevent the transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis C, AIDS, and so forth. Since quality assurance, safety and accuracy must be upheld in the healthcare specialty of phlebotomy, stringent professional behavior requirements and standards of practice exist for phlebotomy technicians.

Persons interested in entering the field must have a high school diploma or G.E.D. before completing a vocational training program in phlebotomy that leads to a postsecondary certificate or diploma. Phlebotomy training programs are offered at many types of postsecondary institutions such as community colleges, state universities, vocational schools, and private for-profit academies. These programs vary in length, but most are only a few months long.

Since the majority of employers prefer to hire phlebotomists who have professional certification, many entities will certify the phlebotomy technician’s body of knowledge. The National Healthcareer Association, the American Society for Clinical Pathology, the National Phlebotomy Association, the Association of Phlebotomy Technicians, and the American Medical Certification Association are five entities that offer professional certification to phlebotomy technicians.

Phlebotomy technicians are in high demand for the near future. Job openings have increased noticeably because many healthcare workplaces need to hire phlebotomy technicians for all three shifts to ensure 24-hour staffing coverage. Employment of phlebotomy technicians is projected to increase by 27 percent through the year 2022, much faster than the average for all occupations.

Healthcare Career Spotlight: the Personal Care Assistant

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Personal care assistants, also known as direct care workers, personal care attendants, direct care staff, home care aides, paid caregivers, healthcare assistants, carers, home health or personal care aides, are allied healthcare workers who provide hands-on assistance to clients who are not able to help themselves.

The clients of personal care assistants are often unable to help themselves due to a wide variety of reasons that might include lengthy illness, cognitive or mental impairment, acute injury, physical disability, advanced age, weakness or fragility. Other clients may be rendered unable to care for themselves due to intellectual and developmental disabilities, limited mobility, paralysis, debility or congenital handicaps.

Personal care assistants typically work in the home setting and assist their clients with various activities of daily living, such as showering, bathing, toileting, feeding, grooming, and taking medications. Personal care assistants may also be responsible for other tasks such as meal preparation, light housekeeping duties, and companionship.

In addition to the aforementioned tasks, personal care assistants might also assist their clients in the instrumental activities of daily living that help ensure households run smoothly. These instrumental activities can include the provision or arrangement of transportation, physicians’ appointments, ensuring clients take their medications, and other duties. Personal care assistants often serve as companions to their clients.

Most personal care assistants are employed by home care agencies to report to the homes of clients, while some personal care assistants are hired directly into private duty cases by clients or family members of the client. Likewise, some personal care assistants are employed by personal care group homes, assisted living facilities and independent living complexes where they often report directly or indirectly to a licensed nurse.

The typical personal care assistant tends to work long hours. Their role can be physically demanding on occasion due to lifting requirements and extended periods of time spent in a standing position. Nonetheless, this healthcare career can be very fulfilling due to the profound sense of purpose many workers derive after helping people who cannot help themselves. Providing companionship to clients can be invigorating.

The majority of personal care assistants have earned a minimum of a high school diploma or general education diploma (GED) certificate, but this level of education is not required by all employers. Sometimes the training for the personal care assistant role is done on the job by licensed nurses or other assistants with more experience.

The on-the-job training typically provided to personal care assistants is comprised of safety information, response to common emergency issues, and other duties specific to the home or employer. Additional training topics may include proper body mechanics, self-care techniques, and ways to deal with difficult client behaviors.

A number of states may require personal care assistants to complete more formalized occupational training from an adult education center, vocational school, nurse aide training academy, community college program or other home health entity. Also, certification is mandated for all personal care assistants who work for companies that receive reimbursements and payments from the Medicare or Medicaid programs.

A healthcare career as a personal care assistant opens the doors to wonderful attributes such as steady income and job security. The Baby Boomer generation is aging and becoming elderly; therefore, personal care assistant job openings will increase at a speedy pace in the foreseeable future. Personal care assistant job openings are projected to increase by 69 percent, much faster than the average of all other occupations.

 

Reasons to Consider a Healthcare Career (Part Six)

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NOTE: This piece is the sixth and final post in a comprehensive six-part essay that attempts to bring light to some of the predominant reasons a person should seriously think about carving out a career pathway in the booming healthcare industry. Click here to read the first essayClick here to read the second part, and click here for part three. Meanwhile, click here for parts four and five.

The healthcare industry is absolutely booming in many geographical regions across the country. Therefore, it would make common sense that this large field would be saturated with countless job opportunities, as well as the potential for measurable growth in the long term. However, an individual needs to have enough tenacity and persistent follow-through abilities in order to enter the ranks of the healthcare industry.

Nonetheless, plenty of perks and positive aspects await the people who possess the perseverance to pursue healthcare as a career choice. A number of truly compelling reasons exist for traveling down a career pathway in the healthcare field. Parts one, two, three, four and five of this six-part series listed plenty of reasons to obtain a healthcare occupation. Keep reading to find out added info regarding even more of these reasons.

REASON 16: Entry-level healthcare jobs offer superb chances for career advancement.

An individual who enters the healthcare industry as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) can make the choice to attain additional education and occupational training to advance his or her career. A CNA can become either a medication aide (also known as a medication technician), patient care technician, phlebotomy technician, or certified medical assistant.

CNAs can also keep climbing the educational ladder to become a licensed practical /vocational nurse (LPN /LVN), registered nurse (RN), dialysis technician, medical technologist, medical lab technician, certified pharmacy technician, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instructor, or any number of other interesting roles in the vast healthcare sector.

People in healthcare also qualify for vertical and lateral promotions. For instance, an astute nurse aide can be promoted to a staffing coordinator or central supply manager at many skilled nursing facilities. After all, a sizable number of healthcare facilities prefer to promote good employees rather than recruit talented people externally. When it comes to career advancement in the healthcare field, the sky is truly the limit!

REASON 17: Healthcare is an industry that is expanding at a fast pace.

The healthcare industry is rapidly expanding due to a number of factors, including the large wave of older persons that belong to the Baby Boomer generation who are aging and requiring health services in ever-increasing numbers. Also, the number of people in the general population is increasing in many geographical areas due to birth rates, relocation patterns, and so forth.

All of the aforementioned reasons result in grand openings and /or expansion projects of hospitals and other types of healthcare centers to meet the increased demand from potential patients and clients. If the population in a particular city is increasing at a fast pace, healthcare facilities need to be built to accommodate all the potential people who will eventually seek care.

REASON 18: A healthcare career can personally fulfill employees.

Many healthcare workers and providers find that a career in the healthcare field is personally fulfilling. When working in some healthcare roles, there can often be very intimate involvement in some of life’s most transforming moments. Some of these moments include childbirth, impending death, and everything in between. For some healthcare workers, the fulfillment they receive is invigorating in the best way possible.

Call the Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School at (682)626-5266 to ask about enrolling in either the 7-day CNA program, the 2-week CNA class, or the 3-week CNA course in the Dallas /Fort Worth area of Texas. It is your choice. In addition, feel free to visit the school’s informative website at www.LegacyHealthcareCareers.com to find out more information about the school’s affordable nurse aide training programs. Jump-start your legacy!

Reasons to Consider a Healthcare Career (Part Five)

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NOTE: This piece is the fifth in a six-part essay that aims to further explore many of the key reasons to seriously think about paving a career pathway in the healthcare field. Click here to read the first blog post in this seriesClick here to read part two, and click right here to read part three. Finally, click here for parts four and sixEnjoy!

There’s a whole host of undeniably great reasons to fit a healthcare occupation into one’s future career aspirations. Parts onetwo, three and four of this six-part series of postings brought some desperately needed light upon a number of compelling reasons to consider a dynamic career in the healthcare sector.

Moreover, there’s more great news. This is due to the fact that some additional reasons exist for entering the ranks of the burgeoning healthcare industry. Continue reading to find out even more information about the myriad of wonderful reasons to have a healthcare career in the 21st century. This career information may or may not transform someone’s professional and personal life for the better.

REASON THIRTEEN: Healthcare workers tend to have comfortable, nice workplace environments.

The working environments of most healthcare workers are rather desirable places of employment due to cleanliness and image grooming for the public. The majority of people who work in the healthcare field report to places of employment that are cleaned on a routine basis, ergonomically designed for comfort, climate-controlled and welcoming to employees, patients, vendors and visitors.

A nice workplace environment is something a healthcare worker should be extremely thankful and grateful for. After all, think about the masses of hard-working ditch diggers, construction workers, mail carriers, long distance truck drivers and farm workers who toil outdoors in the extreme heat, heavy rain, high winds, snow, hail, sleet, freezing conditions, and all types of other inclement weather conditions.

REASON FOURTEEN: Healthcare workers have the opportunity to own a business.

One of the most alluring aspects about becoming a healthcare worker is the opportunity to own one’s business. Most healthcare workers will inevitably work for other people as employees of various companies. However, many individuals in the healthcare industry eventually own and operate their places of business. All it takes is an entrepreneurial spirit and some solid business sense to turn one’s dreams of business ownership into an awesome reality.

Healthcare workers and providers who own their businesses include the countless physicians who own their clinics and private practices, as well as the nurses who own and operate medical supply stores and med spas. Some home health aides and medical assistants utilize their work experience to successfully own and operate private duty personal care agencies. Meanwhile, some pharmacists own consulting firms and/or private pharmacies.

The ultimate appeal of becoming one’s own boss is a magnetic aspect that attracts many new entrants to the healthcare industry. A person could feasibly establish his or her own hours of business operations, run every aspect of the business, purchase or lease office space or a storefront, or even manage some types of businesses from home. In fact, many consulting firms and online businesses are owned and operated directly out of a spare bedroom in the owner’s home.

Even though owning and operating a business can induce anxiety at first, it is a highly popular route to travel. The sheer amount of flexibility and control that comes with owning a business can be mind-blowing. In addition, not every individual is cut out to be someone else’s employee. Some people are actually more appropriate for business ownership due to personality traits that make entrepreneurship a more suitable choice from which to generate a livelihood.

REASON FIFTEEN: Healthcare workers can work virtually anywhere.

Healthcare workers can work in almost any geographic region where health services are needed. After all, infants continue to be born in all 50 states, so the obstetrics profession is in demand in all 50 states. People continue to be terminally ill in all 50 states, so the reality of impending death results in job openings for healthcare workers in the hospice and palliative care sub-specialties.

People need healthcare at all stages in the circle of life from the moment they are born until the day they die. Infants, children, adolescents, young adults, middle aged people and senior citizens will all need care from healthcare workers at various points in their respective lifespans. This translates into an exciting array of employment opportunities in the healthcare sector regardless of one’s geographic location.

Place a telephone call to Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School at (682)626-5266 to enroll in either the 7-day CNA program, the 2-week CNA class, or the 3-week CNA course in the Dallas /Fort Worth area of Texas. Additionally, feel free to visit the school’s informative website at www.LegacyHealthcareCareers.com to gather more information about the affordable nurse aide training programs. Jump-start your legacy!

 

 

Reasons to Consider a Healthcare Career (Part Four)

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NOTE: This piece is the fourth in a six-part essay that seeks to cast some light on the top reasons to think about entering a healthcare career pathway. Click here to read the first essay. Click here to read the second part, and click right here to read part three. Click here for parts five and six.

A number of amazing reasons exist for integrating a healthcare career into one’s future career plans. The overwhelming majority of people cannot lose out by becoming a part of the healthcare industry, regardless of their current skill level or prior educational attainment. Inexperienced entry-level workers are very much welcomed in healthcare, and so are the highly experienced career changers.

Parts one, two, three, five and six and of this six-part essay arguably succeeded at shedding some light on good reasons to think about selecting a career in the healthcare sector. Guess what? There are some additional reasons for joining the ranks of the healthcare sector. Continue reading to find out more about these fantastic reasons to become a healthcare worker in the near future.

REASON 10: The healthcare sector has a refreshing array of variety.

It has been previously said that “variety is the spice of life.” Healthcare contains plenty of variety that keeps things interesting for those who work in this booming industry. The healthcare industry is home to a number of diverse and fulfilling career pathways. There are healthcare careers that involve direct hands-on patient care, managerial duties, scientific research, administration, consultative services, educational instruction, and innovation.

Healthcare workers can work in a multitude of workplace settings. Healthcare workers can be found working in healthcare environments such as acute care hospitals, skilled nursing home facilities, insurance companies, the pharmaceutical industry, jails, prisons, personal care group homes, colleges, the military, schools, and hospice. Healthcare workers also secure employment with the federal government, home health companies, clinics, physicians offices, elementary schools, and infusion centers.

REASON 11: Healthcare sector occupations have good opportunities for career progression.

Career progression, also known as career mobility, is a great process in which workers climb up the different rungs of the economic ladder in order to to earn higher pay and achieve more occupational prestige. For instance, a nursing assistant can go back to school to become a licensed practical nurse (LPN), licensed vocational nurse (LVN), registered nurse (RN) or advanced practice nurse (APN).

A certified pharmacy technician can go to pharmacy school to pursue a lucrative career as a pharmacist, and a physician’s assistant (PA-C) can attend medical school to become a licensed physician who works in any number of great medical specialties. There are many more examples of career progression in the healthcare field.

In addition, the healthcare field has always welcomed entrants who have clear-cut aspirations of advancing their careers. In general, nurse managers love it when a patient care assistant expresses the desire to return to college part-time to become a nurse. Nursing home administrators are often supportive of employees who opt to take additional coursework to become licensed nursing facility administrators.

REASON 12: Healthcare workers play key roles to help clients improve and get better.

Healthcare workers play an integral role in assisting clients to improve their outcomes. Essentially, most types of healthcare workers help clients improve and heal, whether it is through direct patient care or more indirect methods. It is important that patients who enter the healthcare system start feeling better and improving as soon as humanly possible, and healthcare workers use their skills to facilitate these improvements.

Patients progress more optimally when an interdisciplinary team of healthcare workers and providers contribute to their care because each worker brings a different type of expertise to the table. For example, physicians diagnose and treat disease processes while nurses plan the care of their patients. Pharmacists do a number of important things to enhance compliance to medication regimens. Nursing assistants provide direct hands-on care while communicating changes in the patients’ statuses.

This is a gentle reminder that if you are in the Dallas /Fort Worth area of Texas, you can transform your life in only 7 days by training at Legacy Healthcare Careers to become a nursing assistant through our 7-day CNA program. Call Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School at (682)626-5266 to enroll in either the 7-day CNA program, the 2-week CNA class, or the 3-week CNA class.

You can also visit the school’s website at www.LegacyHealthcareCareers.com to apply online and/or collect additional info on the affordable, high quality nurse aide training programs that are offered. Now is the perfect time to jump-start your legacy…

 

Reasons to Consider a Healthcare Career (Part Two)

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NOTE: This is the second piece in a five-part series that aims to bring up some compelling reasons for considering a career in the healthcare industry. Click here to read part one of this series.

As some might already know, the healthcare sector is a huge industry that employs a whole lot of people in the United States and around the world. In addition, the healthcare sector continues to grow each and every day due to an array of factors. These factors include an increasing population, varied funding sources, and a large number of aging people that belong to the Baby Boomer generation who need healthcare since they have chronic illnesses that are associated with advanced age.

Hence, it would make logical sense that a massive field such as the healthcare industry would be loaded with plenty of lucrative opportunities for those with enough tenacity and grit to continually plug away at it until they meet their career goals. A multitude of great reasons exist for seriously thinking about paving a path into healthcare career. Continue to read in order to discover a few more of these solid reasons!

REASON 4: There is the potential to have a positive impact on patients.

Regardless of one’s role or job title in the healthcare industry, every single task will contribute in some way to helping patients and their families. A career in the healthcare field enables workers to achieve their goals of assisting people while simultaneously earning a paycheck and livelihood. Every duty and task in healthcare is meaningful and effective in some way.

As previously stated, one’s role in healthcare does not matter in relation to the positive things that can be carried out. For instance, a dietary aide can make a patient feel like his preferences matter when she asks him about his likes and dislikes concerning food. A nursing assistant can lift the spirits of the lonely elderly patient by paying attention to him. The activities director can spark interest and put smiles on the faces of bored nursing home residents.

REASON 5: Multiple career options exist for people with differing preferences.

Some people thrive when they have close contact with others. These people would be fulfilled with a healthcare career that allows them to provide direct patient care and build meaningful relationships during the course of each shift at work. Nursing assistants, nurses, and other members of direct care nursing staff typically have the closest contact with patients and their families.

Other people prefer to assist society in a more indirect manner while working behind the scenes. These types of people would also be fulfilled with a career in the healthcare field that allows them to be of assistance in a less visible way. For instance, case managers coordinate the care of patients and assist them with obtaining services without ever laying a finger on them. A few case managers work remotely via telephone, and therefore, never meet patients face to face.

REASON 6: Healthcare workers are held in high esteem by the public.

Individuals who work in the healthcare field are often held in high esteem as valuable members of society. This is due to the fact that they devote their time to at work to assist other people. Healthcare workers of all types are also regarded as important because they routinely provide services that are very much needed and potentially life-saving.

The nursing assistant who notifies the charge nurse on duty that one of her patients has left-sided chest pain might have saved a life by reporting a change in a patient’s status in a timely manner, thereby preventing a heart attack. The restorative aide who assists a choking patient with the Heimlich maneuver during mealtime might have saved a life by intervening with a sense of urgency.

Healthcare workers give so much of themselves throughout the course of a typical shift at the workplace. Most members of the general public are keenly aware of the sacrifices made by the selfless people who work in the healthcare industry. Therefore, the public tends to view healthcare workers in an immensely positive light.

Now is the time to enter the healthcare industry. You can enjoy a career as a nursing assistant in as little as 7 days (one week) in the D/FW area of Texas. Call Legacy Healthcare Careers CNA School at (682)626-5266 to enroll in affordable certified assistant classes now. Jump-start your legacy today…